Tips for using Browse:

Browsing is a valuable way to learn about birds, however it is a brute force approach and not designed for identification. A more sophisticated approach to finding a bird with specific field marks is to use the Step by Step Search. You can also try the Wizard to find a bird, which uses a question and answer approach, but again it does not give you the flexibility of the Step by Step Search.

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Northern Bobwhite
Northern Bobwhite: Medium, morphologically variable quail, most with unique head pattern of white face and throat, dark eyestripe, rufous-brown (eastern and Great Plains) or black (Florida) center stripe on top of head. Body shows a mottled combination of black, brown, rufous-brown, and gray.
Bananaquit
Bananaquit: Small and short-tailed with short, decurved black bill. Bahamensis is gray-black above with white throat and yellow belly with bold white stripe over eyes. Rump is yellow. Legs and feet are black. Martinique has dark throat. Weak fluttering flight, alternates rapid wing beats with brief periods of wings pulled to sides.
Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler
Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler: Medium warbler, dark-streaked, blue-gray upperparts, yellow rump. White throat and belly, breast white and black streaked, yellow patches on the sides. Head gray with yellow crown, white crescent under eyes, white supercilium, black lores and cheeks. Dark wings with two white bars. Tail is dark with white corners.
Yellow-faced Grassquit
Yellow-faced Grassquit: This tiny finch has olive upperparts, pale olive underparts, black face, breast and upper belly, yellow eyebrow and throat patch, and a conical, sharply pointed bill. Forages on the ground for seeds; also feeds on berries, small fruits and insects. It has a weak fluttering flight, alternating rapid wing beats with wings pulled to the sides. Sexes are similar.
Hill Myna
Hill Myna: Large, stocky, glossy black starling with bright orange bill, unique fleshy lobes of bright yellow skin behind and below eyes, and prominent white wing patch. Yellow legs and feet. Extremely vocal, mimics other birds. It is a popular cage bird, renowned for its ability to imitate speech.
Scaly-breasted Munia
Scaly-breasted Munia: This small finch has chestnut-brown upperparts and dark-scaled white underparts. The head is richer brown and the bill is heavy and dark. It forages on the ground or hangs from stems to eat seeds; also feeds on greens and insects. Rapid fluctuating flight, gliding into cover. Native to Southeast Asia, where they have been popular as cage birds. Sexes are similar. AKA Spice Finch. Name changed from Nutmeg Mannikin to Scaly-breasted Munia in 2014 by the American Ornithologist Union.
White-tailed Hawk
White-tailed Hawk: Large hawk, dark gray upperparts and head, distinct brown wash on shoulders and back, and white rump. Breast is white; belly and undertail are white with inconspicuous, fine bars. Wings are dark gray above, paler below. Tail is white, broad black band near tip. Yellow legs, feet.
American Flamingo
American Flamingo: Tall, unique wading bird, entirely pink except for rear edge of wing and black-tipped bill that is bent at a curious angle. Feeds on algal material, bacteria diatoms, plankton, small fish and brine fly larvae. Direct flight with rapid wing beats. Flies in straight line formation. Formerly known as Greater Flamingo.
Nanday Parakeet
Nanday Parakeet: Medium parakeet, green overall, black head, chin, yellow eye-ring. Blue wash on throat and breast, deep blue outer webs on flight feathers and tips of tail feathers. Flight, tail feathers are gray underneath. Underwing linings are pale yellow-green. Formerly known as the Black-hooded Parakeet. Name was changed by the American Ornithologist Union in 2014.