David Case

In Search of an Acorn (part 1) - Confirmations and IDs

14 posts in this topic

I went out early yesterday morning in search of a lifer, the Acorn Woodpecker, and along the way encountered a variety of other birds that could use confirmations /IDs. Apologies in advance, there are lots of really bad pics here. There are quite a few so I'll break this into two posts. These were all taken on 6/28/13 in or near Fern Ridge Wildlife Area, Eugene, OR.

 

(1) no idea

1ZavuaR.jpg

 

(2.1 & 2.2) European Starling - what else could it be? Is it looking for food or do Starlings nest in cavities?

gwn2Jyp.jpg

 

9eS8ljn.jpg

 

(3) Spotted Towhee

E6uLzhw.jpg

 

(4.1 & 4.2) female House Sparrow, juvenile Dark-eyed Junco, or something else?

aptwZJI.jpg

 

OJcHrUs.jpg

 

(5.1 & 5.2) no idea

4WcDQrp.jpg

 

kMY52kA.jpg

 

(6) Morning Dove - the face is not visible but I can't see what else it could be.

G4FLoBQ.jpg

 

Thanks all!

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1. Juvenile European Starling

2. They nest in cavities

3. Yep!!

4. Juv. Dark Eyed Junco, or maybe Spotted Towhee Juv.

5.Also Juv. European Starling

6. Could also be a Eurasian-Collared, they're spreading!!

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4 looks better for Junco, between the proportions and the white outer tail feather.

6 looks much better for Collared-Dove than Mourning, to my eyes -- Mourning should have some dark spots on the wing coverts.

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1-2 European Starling (first pic shows a juvenile)

3. Confirmed

4. Juv Vesper Sparrow or a Juv Dark-eyed Junco

5. European Starling

6. Mourning Dove missing tail feathers (Eurasian Collared Dove would be very rare)

 

Ben

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1. Juvenile European Starling

2. They nest in cavities

3. Yep!!

4. Juv. Dark Eyed Junco, or maybe Spotted Towhee Juv.

5.Also Juv. European Starling

6. Could also be a Eurasian-Collared, they're spreading!!

 

4 looks better for Junco, between the proportions and the white outer tail feather.

6 looks much better for Collared-Dove than Mourning, to my eyes -- Mourning should have some dark spots on the wing coverts.

 

1-2 European Starling (first pic shows a juvenile)

3. Confirmed

4. Juv Vesper Sparrow or a Juv Dark-eyed Junco

5. European Starling

6. Mourning Dove missing tail feathers (Eurasian Collared Dove would be very rare)

 

Ben

Thanks everyone. So the collective opinion is at this point:

1. European Starling juvie

2. European Starling adult

3. Spotted Towhee

4. Dark-eyed Junco juvie with Vesper Sparrow juvie or Spotted Towhee juvie as possibilites

5. European Starling juvie

6. Eurasian Collared Dove (2 people) Mourning Dove (1 person)

 

Ben, with respect to 6. it looks to me like the tail feathers are obscured by the platform rather than missing.

 

Eurasian Collared Dove would be a lifer so it would be nice to confirm this one if possible. I will do some checking to see if any have been spotted in the area recently.

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e-bird lists Collared-Dove as common to uncommon year-round for Lane County. If you're trying to determine Collared-Dove ranges by field guides, you're out of luck -- they're expanding faster than the guides can be updated. If this is a Mourning Dove, he's missing the spots on the tertials and coverts, and that seems pretty unlikely.

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e-bird lists Collared-Dove as common to uncommon year-round for Lane County. If you're trying to determine Collared-Dove ranges by field guides, you're out of luck -- they're expanding faster than the guides can be updated. If this is a Mourning Dove, he's missing the spots on the tertials and coverts, and that seems pretty unlikely.

Thanks, psweet. You are always so helpful and I really appreciate it. I was planning to see if I could find reports in any recent birding checklists. I did notice that this bird looked chunkier than a Mourning Dove, but thought perhaps its feathers were fluffed. Another thought, there is no collar visible. Would it be, given the position of the bird?

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The overall very pale color of the dove speaks in favor of Collared as well.

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Also, I agree with Junco for the fledgling, there's too much white in the tail for anything else, even a Vesper Sparrow, and the back is too solidly colored.

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The overall very pale color of the dove speaks in favor of Collared as well.

 

Also, I agree with Junco for the fledgling, there's too much white in the tail for anything else, even a Vesper Sparrow, and the back is too solidly colored.

 

Thanks, that helps. :)

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David, without much effort I heard one and saw another Eur. Collared Dove when I was in the Albany/Corvallis areas last week. (It was a lifer for me, too. :) ) My son didn't seem to think they were all that uncommon...

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David, without much effort I heard one and saw another Eur. Collared Dove when I was in the Albany/Corvallis areas last week. (It was a lifer for me, too. :) ) My son didn't seem to think they were all that uncommon...

That's good to know, cestma. My local books and checklists don't list it so they are out of date I suppose. Hmm, wonder what else I might be missing?

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There's always some change in bird ranges, but Eurasian Collared Dove is a very special case. 13 years ago, Sibley's showed them as far north as northern South Carolina and as far west as New Orleans, with scattered sightings across the eastern 2/3 of the country. Now, they're found coast to coast, with only the northeast and Alaska (of the US, that is) not showing regular occurrences.

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There's always some change in bird ranges, but Eurasian Collared Dove is a very special case. 13 years ago, Sibley's showed them as far north as northern South Carolina and as far west as New Orleans, with scattered sightings across the eastern 2/3 of the country. Now, they're found coast to coast, with only the northeast and Alaska (of the US, that is) not showing regular occurrences.

We've had them where I live for years. I don't see a lot of them, but they are certainly here.

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