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Question about Full Frame vs. Crop Frame sensors


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#1 notactuallytom

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:37 PM

If I stick the same lens on a crop body and a full frame body, and shoot the same subject from the same distance away, at the same Aperture and ISO, can I get a faster shutter speed with the full frame body while maintaining the exact same exposure as the crop body? Or, is a full frame body's ability to shoot better in low-light conditions directly related only to it's ability to perform better at higher ISO's?


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#2 Joejr14

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 12:16 AM

Correct. Sensor size does not affect shutter speed. Normally full frame cameras do better in higher isos due to pixel size.

#3 JimBob

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 12:43 AM

Just wondering, is there a a way to turn off the crop factor of cameras? 


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#4 lonestranger

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 01:46 AM

Just wondering, is there a a way to turn off the crop factor of cameras? 

 

No, crop factor is based on the size of the camera's sensor compared to 35mm film. The only way to change the crop factor is to change the size of the sensor. There is however a way to change the aspect ratio of your pictures, either through your camera's menu system or editing software. That changes the length x width dimensions of your images but has no bearing on the actual crop factor.


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#5 JimBob

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 08:56 PM

No, crop factor is based on the size of the camera's sensor compared to 35mm film. The only way to change the crop factor is to change the size of the sensor. There is however a way to change the aspect ratio of your pictures, either through your camera's menu system or editing software. That changes the length x width dimensions of your images but has no bearing on the actual crop factor.

 

Thanks! I think I've seen the way to change the aspect ratio in my camera menu...


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#6 Benjamin DeHaven

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 03:30 PM

Full frame DSLR typically have a much better noise profile due to the larger size of the light sensors (pixels) on the larger chip.  You can turn on crop factor on a full frame camera (Nikon anyway) to use crop frame lenses but your megapixel count drops dramatically since you are basically turning off the outlying pixels.  Crop sensor camera are actually nice to have while shooting wildlife since you get the equivalent of a free teleconverter (Nikon = 1.5 crop factor).  And here I mean free in the sense of light.  If you put a 1.4 teleconverter on a full frame 500mm f/4 lens you will be shooting with the equivalent of a 700mm f/5.6 lens.  If you put that same 500mm f/4 lens on a crop sensor camera like the D7000 (again, Nikon = 1.5 crop factor) without the teleconverter you are shooting with a 750mm f/4 lens.  You have a full stop more light with a touch more length.  You however give up the better noise profile of the full frame camera.  So depending on what you are shooting and how close you can get yourself either one could be best though I find that more often than not I am better off with the crop frame (not that I have a choice since I don't have the mega dollars to invest in full frame equipment).

 

Nothing said before this is wrong in anyway, just wanted to add some additional information.


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#7 notactuallytom

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:43 PM

Yeah, same here. I need those mega dollars lol! I've been finding lately that I'm able to get so close to the birds that I'm wishing the framing wasn't so tight, but I still like the level of detail I get from a close shot. Also noise levels I previously accepted are now no good to me, but shooting warblers at 400 ISO is near impossible under tree cover.


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