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Weekly (more or less) Photo Quiz! *Version 2*


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#1 maxrazor

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 07:44 PM

Several years ago there was a photo quiz that was started by a user called Featherbrain. He started a special kind of quiz that he answered every weekend with helpful tips on birdwatching and identification skills. I looked through the thread once again and decided that we need to have an updated Version 2.

RULES are the same:

DO NOT post your answers here as it might influence other peoples answers, email it directly to me at: quiz.whatbird@yahoo.com

When you send your answer include your Whatbird name. 

The post moderators are going to be:

Maxrazor

Liam

BirderMadeleine

The moderators will help post answers as well as help in informing players of the game about rules and other things.

Scores are going to be kept for each correctly answered question.

Scoreboard: (remember if you don't want to be listed just let me know)

 All the photos are worth 5 points unless otherwise stated.

Answers will be posted (more or less) on Sundays and new quizzes will be posted on Monday, giving you a week to find out.

OK! To kick off the quiz we will start with this photo. If you need tips (such as location) then just post.

Remember to not post your answers here

 Location: near Banff Alberta, Canada



#2 Simon Zur

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:37 PM

OK, Where is this bird?

#3 maxrazor

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:53 PM

The photo or the location? Location is near Banff Alberta Canada

#4 maxrazor

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:07 AM

 

This quiz was helping us understand non-breeding ID’s in some waterfowl, based on discriminating birds with subtle differences.

 

To start, we can see that the bird is a water bird, so this brings our range of possible species way down to just a few. Another characteristic that is evident is that it has a pointed bill and it sits low down in the water. This eliminates all the ducks and other types of waterfowl, such as herons and dabbling ducks, and brings us down to the loons and grebes.

 

The bird appears to be medium duck sized which makes it toobig for grebes, so now we just need to narrow it down to a single species ofloon. Since the birds location is near Banff, then we can eliminate the Arctic loon by range alone, and the Yellow-billed Loon can be eliminated not only by its rarity, but also because the bird in thephoto lacks the slightly upturned bill that is present in the Yellow-billed loon. This leaves the Pacific, Red-throated, and Common loons.

 

None of these loons in breeding plumage look like the individual in the photo, so we must conclude that this bird was in a different type of plumage. This being taken into account we can start to narrow down the bird according to little characteristic differences between the other species. Red-throated loons have extensive white areas on the throat and neck area in their non-breeding plumage, which this bird does not have. The Pacific loon has a black strap underneath its chin, and this bird doesn’t have that either. The Common loon has a black bit pointing out towards the front of the bird with a white cutback, and the photographed individual has just that pattern, so it must be a Common Loon.

 

I photographed this non-breeding plumage Common Loon at Barrier Lake, Alberta last fall.

 

Tallies of incorrect guesses:

Yellow-billed Loon - 4

 

Congratulations to:

Kcbirder

Kryptos18

Danielle

Bird Brain

Spyonabird

Chickenjoe

Ceylon

cwj2323

Stitch58 

Roundywaves 

 

Score Board

Kcbirder – 5

Kryptos18 – 5

Danielle – 5

Bird Brain – 5

Spyonabird – 5

Chickenjoe - 5

Ceylon– 5

Stitch58 - 5 

Roundywaves - 5 

 

Also, extra congrats to cwj2323 for correctly identifying the loons plumage as non-breeding plumage

 

Thank you all for participating!

Next photo will be posted on Monday!



#5 roundywaves

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 03:50 PM

Where are we supposed to send the answers?  I sent a right answer to you, but am not in the list.  I assume I sent it to the wrong place.  edit:  So I can't read:)  Now I see it.  I really did look for it.

#6 maxrazor

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 10:52 AM

Quiz #2

 DO NOT post your answers here as it might influence other peoples answers, email it directly to me at: quiz.whatbird@yahoo.com

When you send your answer include your Whatbird name. 

Please be honest and don't cheat. 



#7 cwj2323

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 12:39 PM

I am going to ask, where was this picture taken? 

 



#8 maxrazor

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:51 PM

Augusta Georgia 



#9 maxrazor

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 08:32 AM

In this quiz we were studying the differences between species of egrets, and particularly distinguishing one of the harder differences between a juvenile of one species and an adult bird of a different species.

On to the bird, first step is determining the shape of the bird to narrow down to the family. The bird has a long pointed bill, and long legs and an upright stance. There are not many birds that look like this except for the egrets and herons. This was taken in Georgia USA so that will narrow it down to only egrets and herons found in the southern US states.

 

There are no adult herons that have white plumage, so we can look to the Egrets to narrow down possibilities. First up is the Great Egret. The Great Egret is too large for this bird, and it also has black feet and legs and a yellow bill. The individual in the photo has a bluish bill and yellow legs. The Snowy Egret which has a black bill with a yellow cere area and black legs with yellow feet. The Cattle Egret has a yellow bill once again, which is not on the photographed individual. The Reddish Egret is dark, and the Little Egret has a black bill and legs with yellow feet, and the Chinese Egret can only be found rarely in the Aleutians. We eliminated all the Egrets!

 

Now the only thing that we can do is look at the other plumages of some of the other birds. Great Blue Heron juveniles look similar to their parents, along with the Cattle, Least and Snowy and Great Egrets. When we look at the Reddish Egret Juveniles we see that they have a black bill and black legs and feet with white plumage. This is close but not quite what our bird looks like. The only bird we haven’t looked at yet is the Little Blue Heron. The Little Blue in adult form does not look like this bird, but in juvenile form, we see some similarity: Bluish black bill, and yellow legs, and striking white plumage.

 

So we have discerned the small differences between the Juvenile and adult egrets and herons and found their distinguishing field marks to help us determine the species of heron or egret.

 

Liam photographed this juvenile Little Blue Heron in Phinizy Swamp area in Augusta Georgia.

 

Tallies of incorrect guesses:

Snowy Egret - 1

 

Congratulations to:

Roundywaves

Kcbirder

Col.Weed

Spyonabird

Corbett

Kryptos18

Firebird2011

Cwj2323

Stitch58

Ceylon

 

Score Board

Kcbirder – 10

Kryptos18 – 10

Spyonabird – 10

Ceylon– 10

Stitch58 - 10

Danielle – 5

Bird Brain – 5

Chickenjoe - 5

Roundywaves – 5

Col. Weed – 5

Corbett – 5

Firebird2011 – 5

 

Thank you all for participating!

Next photo will be posted on Monday

 



#10 BirderMadeleine

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 09:54 AM

Quiz #3

DO NOT post your answers here as it might influence other peoples answers,

email it directly to: quiz.whatbird@yahoo.com

When you send your answer include your Whatbird name.



#11 ceylon

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 08:10 PM

I missed the location.

 

Ceylon 



#12 BirderMadeleine

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 07:22 PM

Hi Ceylon,

Actually, I left off the location just to make it a bit more challenging.



#13 BirderMadeleine

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 09:03 PM

This week's quiz was about trying to identify a bird by focusing mainly on the bird's silhouette, along with studying the only few visible field marks that might help us with the ID process. The silhouette tells us a lot about a bird, (body shape, bill shape, the bird's posture, etc). The silhouette helps us narrow down a bird to a limited number of species, or family, by shape and size. Obviously, our bird is not a waterbird, or a shorebird. It isn't the right size or shape to be a bird of prey, and we can tell by posture and the way the bird is perched, that it isn't a warbler either. Our bird is a medium-sized passerine, with a long tail. 

When we enlarge the photo, the bird doesn't appear to be a light, or colorful bird, but dark and kind of dull, maybe gray. Ok, now we're getting somewhere! When we think of medium sized, fairly long-tailed, gray birds, Townsend's Solitaire, Gray Jay, Northern Mockingbird, Gray Catbird, and the Shrikes may come to mind.     

We can eliminate Townsend's Solitaire and Gray Jay by range alone. Townsend's Solitaire is a bird of the mountains of western North America. The Gray Jay is found in a few states in the western U.S, and up into Canada and Alaska. Our bird was both seen and photographed in San Antonio, Texas. Both the Townsend's Solitaire and Gray Jay would be extremely rare in southern TX.

Let's move on to the Northern Mockingbird. If our bird was a Mockingbird, Overall, it would be larger, and the tail would be longer. Let's look very closely at our bird. Look at the wing. The wing is black with a small white patch. This bird is lacking the wingbars of a Northern Mockingbird, as well as the large white patch. Now we can also eliminate the Mocker from our list of possibilities. Gray Catbirds are about the same size as a Northern Mockingbird, and have an orangy, rufous color on the the undertail. If we look at the undertail of our bird we can't see any rufous coloration there at all. Also, our bird was photographed during winter, and Gray Catbirds are only here during spring and summer.

Now, we're down to the shrikes. In North America, we only get two species - the Northern Shrike, and the Loggerhead Shrike.

The Northern Shrike looks like it matches up pretty well with our bird, right? It's a medium-sized gray bird, with a long tail, it has the black wing with a small white patch. Now, remember where our bird was seen - it was seen in San Antonio, Texas. Let's check the range map for the Northern Shrike. The Northern Shrike is widely distributed throughout North America, but, (other than a couple of rare sightings) it is not found in Texas. This leaves us with the Loggerhead Shrike. Loggerheads are smaller than Northern Shrikes, and have shorter tails. The Loggerhead is found year-round in the San Antonio area, and is a perfect match for our quiz bird.

I photographed this Loggerhead Shrike last winter at the Mitchell Lake Audubon Center in San Antonio, Texas.

Tallies of incorrect guesses:

  • American Goldfinch - 1
  • Field Sparrow - 1

Congratulations to:

  • Kryptos18
  • Danielle
  • Spyonabird
  • Stitch58

Score Board

  • Kryptos18 - 15
  • Danielle - 10
  • Spyonabird - 15
  • Stitch58 - 15
  • Kcbirder - 10
  • Ceylon - 10
  • Bird brain - 5
  • Chickenjoe - 5
  • Roundywaves - 5
  • Col. Weed - 5
  • Corbett - 5
  • Firebird2011 - 5

 

Thank you all for participating!

Next photo will be posted on Monday 



#14 Liam

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 06:05 PM

Quiz #4

DO NOT post your answers here as it might influence other peoples answers,

email it directly to: quiz.whatbird@yahoo.com

When you send your answer include your Whatbird name.



#15 Bird Brain

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 08:44 PM

I entered quiz.whatbird@yahoo.com and came up with "no results found". ???????

Edit: Funny, after I entered in this post it became clickable and I was able to send it!! Huh? Go figure!!



#16 cwj2323

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 06:59 AM

Could you share the location, please?  :)


#17 Liam

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 09:47 AM

Augusta, Ga.


#18 Liam

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 06:04 PM

In this week's quiz, we differentiate a bird in a nondescript or juvenile plumage. Birds in this stage are harder to identify due to their abnormal plumage. Grown/fully plumaged birds are usually more colorful and have distinct field marks, such as eye rings, facial masks and wing bars. In this case, we can narrow down the possibilities by shape, size, and general color. This particular individual is a slender, small bird that is ochre in color with a yellow throat and longish bill. It has an eyering, but barely and broken. Habitat plays a big part in identification also. After all, how often do you see Redstarts and Pewees flitting among reeds? This eliminats most woodland species. Note the bill is too thick and long for a flycatcher and the general build identifies this bird as a warbler. Habitat and range (Augusta, GA) have furthermore narrowed this individual down to a select number of species. Season (Summer) eliminates wintering species such as Yellow-Rumped Warbler. We now are left with only a few species: Yellow-Throated Warbler, Pine Warbler, and Common Yellowthroat. As is obvious, this bird is not the unique Yellow-Throated Warbler. Pine Warbler seems likely with the coloration of the upperparts and the yellow throat, but lack of wingbars and bill shape eliminate this species from our choices. Therefore, we have a match for our little brown job. This Juvenile Common Yellowthroat was photographed by yours truly at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park in Augusta, Georgia last week.

Tallies of incorrect guesses:

Pine Warbler - 2

Congratulations to:

Corbett

Birdbrain

cwj2323

Kryptos18

stitch58

Cavan Wood

kcbirder

Score Board

Kcbirder – 15

Kryptos18 – 15

Spyonabird – 10

Ceylon– 10

Stitch58 - 15

Danielle – 5

Bird Brain – 10

Chickenjoe - 5

Roundywaves – 5

Col. Weed – 5

Corbett – 10

Firebird2011 – 5

Cavan Wood - 5

 

Thank you all for participating!

Next photo will be posted on Monday

#19 Bird Whisperer

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 02:02 PM

This thread is very educational! I haven't hazarded a guess on any of the pictures yet, but every explanation that I read teaches me a bit more about identifying birds in less-than-optimal circumstances. Although, I do want to make a small comment on Madeleine's picture of a Loggerhead Shrike: if you don't give the quiz participants the location of your find, it would be best if you left range out of the explanation.


#20 spyonabird

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 11:45 AM

will there be a new quiz soon?  I am becoming addicted and I need my fix!






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