Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Tail Twitch


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 EyesOnTheSky

EyesOnTheSky

    EyesOnTheSky

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:27 PM

Some birds like the Eastern Phoebe are well know for their habit of twitching their tails.

 What purpose does this serve?  Must be of some use or they wouldn't expend the energy to do so.



#2 Sinuous

Sinuous

    Sinuous

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts
  • LocationCA

Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:53 PM

EyesOnTheSky:

Some birds like the Eastern Phoebe are well know for their habit of twitching their tails.

 What purpose does this serve?  Must be of some use or they wouldn't expend the energy to do so.

Found a very interesting article that just might help you answer that question: http://www.gazettene...lwaggers-return



#3 illin

illin

    illin

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,115 posts
  • LocationSouth-central Illinois

Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:59 PM

I just brought this up in another thread about Spotted Sandpiper. They bob as they walk, not really the same thing but similar. My hypothesis was that it could flush bugs that the Sandpiper could then catch, Spotteds are sight feeders.I have read in a book (sorry can't remember which) that Redstarts use the fanning of their tales to flush insect to make capture easier. Someone else thought that it could be to attract a mate.

I did some research and could find nothing conclusive online or in books. I posted the question on another forum and was told of the thought that it may be a warning to predators that the bird is aware/vigilant, and would not make a good target of attack. The person that replied to me also said there was a theory that some species use nonverbal communications such as tail wagging/bobbing where auditory communication would be hampered, such as roaring water or high wind. Here is a link to that thread. http://www.ilbirds.c...p?topic=50165.0

This is something that really interests me, if anyone can cite any other information on this subject I would really like to read it.




#4 Sinuous

Sinuous

    Sinuous

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts
  • LocationCA

Posted 08 March 2012 - 03:03 PM

illin:

I just brought this up in another thread about Spotted Sandpiper. They bob as they walk, not really the same thing but similar. My hypothesis was that it could flush bugs that the Sandpiper could then catch, Spotteds are sight feeders.I have read in a book (sorry can't remember which) that Redstarts use the fanning of their tales to flush insect to make capture easier. Someone else thought that it could be to attract a mate.

I did some research and could find nothing conclusive online or in books. I posted the question on another forum and was told of the thought that it may be a warning to predators that the bird is aware/vigilant, and would not make a good target of attack. The person that replied to me also said there was a theory that some species use nonverbal communications such as tail wagging/bobbing where auditory communication would be hampered, such as roaring water or high wind. Here is a link to that thread. http://www.ilbirds.c...p?topic=50165.0

This is something that really interests me, if anyone can cite any other information on this subject I would really like to read it.


This is the link I posted earlier: http://www.gazettene...lwaggers-return

It's actually kinda interesting.



#5 JimBob

JimBob

    Little SuperBirder

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,646 posts
  • LocationSan Diego County

Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:26 AM

I am not sure why birds do this. But when watching a live feeder cam, I noticed that White-tipped Doves twitch their tails.

#6 EyesOnTheSky

EyesOnTheSky

    EyesOnTheSky

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 09 March 2012 - 10:08 AM

Thanks!

And I wanted to ask this but didn't want to waste a new thread in the ID Forum, but is it the norm for some people just to shoot pics of birds and then just post them here to get the ID?  Then add that bird to their life or year list?  

I know we all have different ways of doing things and different ideas of what belongs on our lists (for example, I would never count a heard-only bird).

 

 



#7 Sinuous

Sinuous

    Sinuous

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts
  • LocationCA

Posted 09 March 2012 - 12:48 PM

EyesOnTheSky:

Thanks!

And I wanted to ask this but didn't want to waste a new thread in the ID Forum, but is it the norm for some people just to shoot pics of birds and then just post them here to get the ID?  Then add that bird to their life or year list?  

I know we all have different ways of doing things and different ideas of what belongs on our lists (for example, I would never count a heard-only bird).

 

 

Mean either, I count only birds that I've seen visually, not audibly. 



#8 illin

illin

    illin

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,115 posts
  • LocationSouth-central Illinois

Posted 09 March 2012 - 03:51 PM

EyesOnTheSky:

And I wanted to ask this but didn't want to waste a new thread in the ID Forum, but is it the norm for some people just to shoot pics of birds and then just post them here to get the ID?  Then add that bird to their life or year list?  

If I have a bird I am having trouble with I will post it in the ID forum. If I do not agree with the ID and cannot see the marks that the person replying sees then I would not add it to my list. If the reasons for the ID are pointed out and I see and agree with them, and the consensus is near unanimous, then I will add it to my list. Rule 4 of the ABA recording rules says,

 ABA Listing Rule 4

Diagnostic field-marks for the bird, sufficient to identify to species, must have been seen and/or heard and/or
documented by the recorder at the time of the encounter.

The interpretation of the rule allows for photographic, or written evidence to lead to identification after the fact. It also allows for consulting with those more experienced. Here is the interpretation amendment.

ABA Interpretation of Rule 4 Sec. A, ii

Identification of the bird may be made subsequent to the
initial encounter. It is not always possible to secure a positive
identification initially, but, using physical and/or written
documentation made at the time of the encounter, identification
is sometimes possible after the fact, upon consultation with
references and/or other authorities. In rare, tricky identifications,
for example, photographs sometimes reveal minute, yet critical,
details, that were not visible during the initial encounter.
Furthermore, our knowledge of how to separate similar species in
the field is continually advancing. On rare occasions a species
may not be identifiable until after it has been captured and
studied in the hand, or feather and blood samples analysed. In
such instances of “after-the-fact” ID, the bird may be counted on
one’s life-list.

Like you said it is each person's list to make how they want. You CAN count heard birds on your life list according to ABA rules, I would never do it though. If you go adding questionable records to your list it can lead to problems if you ever compare lists with other birders or decide to submit your list for anything. If there is ever a question it is best to err on the side of caution.

Here is the link to the complete ABA rules.  http://www.aba.org/bigday/rules.pdf



#9 EyesOnTheSky

EyesOnTheSky

    EyesOnTheSky

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:14 PM

I guess I was just surprised that to id birds some people just take pictures of them and then post the pics for other people to identify. 

#10 creeker

creeker

    creeker

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,756 posts
  • LocationSan Diego County

Posted 12 March 2012 - 11:49 PM

EyesOnTheSky:
I guess I was just surprised that to id birds some people just take pictures of them and then post the pics for other people to identify. 

I think most of these posters are new birders. I think they have a pretty good idea what they have and just want verification. Some are more photographer than birder, and just want to make sure they label their photos correctly. There are also those photos that are very vague, and only someone with direct experience with that bird could ID it. It's all fine with me, I enjoy identifying them.



#11 JimBob

JimBob

    Little SuperBirder

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,646 posts
  • LocationSan Diego County

Posted 13 March 2012 - 06:03 AM

creeker:

 I enjoy identifying them.

I do too, don't mind at all. 



#12 EyesOnTheSky

EyesOnTheSky

    EyesOnTheSky

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 13 March 2012 - 08:09 AM

I enjoy trying to id them also.  I'd love to see a sight with bird ID quizes.

#13 creeker

creeker

    creeker

  • New Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,756 posts
  • LocationSan Diego County

Posted 13 March 2012 - 10:32 AM

EyesOnTheSky:
I enjoy trying to id them also.  I'd love to see a sight with bird ID quizes.

Have you seen this?

http://www.whatbird..../ShowForum.aspx

Also a quick google search came up with this super easy one. It changes every time you take it.

http://mybirdingplace.com/Quiz.php






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users