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Eurasian Collared-Dove vs Ringed-neck Dove?


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#1 calepo

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:45 AM

Question. I see these in my front yard quite frequently, intermingled with the Mourning Doves. I had always heard of them referred to as Ring-necked doves (due to the dark ring around their necks), but I can't find that in any of my bird apps. I only find the Eurasian Collared-Dove and their range is a bit outside of where I'm located in Kern County, California. Can somebody here enlighten me?

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#2 Joejr14

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:49 AM

It's a Eur. collared dove. Note the dark undertail coverts and darker primaries. A ringed-turtle dove would be a lot paler, paler primaries, and white undertail coverts. They'd also be smaller.

#3 calepo

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:51 AM

That's what I figured. I wonder if they're here naturally or were introduced. I know that people buy them for pets.

#4 creeker

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:20 AM

They are spreading rapidly throughout North America. They were initially introduced in the Bahamas. They quickly spread to Florida, and beyond. And now you see them in Ridgecrest. The Ringed Turtle Dove, the one you are used to seeing in captivity, does not thrive in the wild so well.
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#5 Pat B.

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:56 AM

One reason for the confusion may be their very rapid spread. Most of the field guides are way off on the range of the Eurasian Collared-doves (kind of like high-tech publications being out of date as soon as they are written) and people sometimes assume that isn't what they are seeing because they aren't "supposed" to be where they are happily living and breeding.

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#6 zoutedrop

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:02 AM

Here is a shot of a Ringed Turtle-Dove with the larger Eurasian Collared-Dove behind it.

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#7 creeker

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:16 AM

Nice Matt. I'm a sucker for these comparison pics! Can't get enough.
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#8 illin

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:29 AM

One way that I tell E.Col. Doves and Mourning doves apart at a distance is the squared off tail. Size is not easy to determine sometimes.

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#9 yep

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:48 AM

One way that I tell E.Col. Doves and Mourning doves apart at a distance is the squared off tail. Size is not easy to determine sometimes.


I don't think the OP was asking how to tell Eastern Collareds from Mournings, they were asking how to tell Eastern Collareds from Ring-necks.
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#10 creeker

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:37 PM

If you're still having problems differentiating the two, this link might help.....

http://www.birds.cor...dovRitdovID.htm
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#11 dklucius

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:28 PM

here the eurasian doves do not migrate away in winter.And they have multiple broods of young ones. and have large broods also. in about 6 years here i have went from a single pair of eurasian doves to flocks of 20 to 25 showing up at one time.there are lots of farm fields and feed lots and pastures close by. and in the late summer and fall when they harvest the grains the fields are full of them and when its cold and snowy many show up around cattle or horse feeding lots. they have crowded out most of the morning doves by their sheer numbers. they are listed on the dove hunting fall hunts and are actively hunted which helps some to keep them down some in numbers.

#12 calepo

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:37 PM

Great side by side shot. The one that I saw was definitely the Eurasian Collared as it was the larger variety. Awesome discussion. I like to hear about why or how birds end up 'out of range'. Fascinating stuff.

#13 Bird Brain

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:47 PM

Great side by side shot. The one that I saw was definitely the Eurasian Collared as it was the larger variety. Awesome discussion. I like to hear about why or how birds end up 'out of range'. Fascinating stuff.


Range is a constantly changing thing, especially for a new/introduced species. Climate changes cause some some species to expand or reduce their range. I remember seeing my first Cattle Egrets in Fla. many, many moons ago. They arrived there from Africa by island-hopping. They weren't even listed as being in N. American at the time. Now they have spread across the US to Calif.

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#14 BarnSwallow

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:31 PM

My father remembers seeing some of the earliest cattle egrets, too. An exotic species!!! But at least they came here on their own. I go to the Delaware beaches every year, and have been since I was born. About 25 years ago, I saw some big birds flying in formation over the beach. I assumed they were Canada geese, until I realized that they were PELICANS!!! I was astounded. They are very common there now and have bred not too far away.

#15 Melissa :)

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:53 PM

Which beach do you go to? I go to Dewey 2-3 times a year and go to all of the best birding spots while down there.

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#16 BarnSwallow

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:00 PM

We've always gone to Rehoboth - we had a house there when I was growing up. However, I spent many nights in Dewey in my younger years!! I'm actually from Wilmington, and my brother still lives there. Where do you bird down there? I got my first, and only, blue grosbeaks at Gordon's Pond.

#17 Melissa :)

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:17 PM

That means I have to go to Gordons Pond... need Blue Grosbeaks :P . You're from Wilmington?? Haha that's where I live. I bird mostly at Bombay Hook NWR and Prime Hook NWR, but sometimes I go to various spots around the Delaware Bay. Cape Henlopen State Park is one of the best places to go, too. And I've heard Silver Lake is a reliable place to find Canvasbacks and Ruddy Ducks, so I'm defiantly going there this summer!!

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#18 BarnSwallow

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:45 PM

I got my first canvasbacks on Silver Lake, but they're not there in the summer. The blue grosbeaks were very accomodating! I was standing on the platform, something caught my eye, and it was a pair of BGs, sitting on the wide path! They left, then came back later. There were also a lot of Baltimore orioles there.

I've been to Bombay Hook, but it's been a long time. I'm going to try to get to Pocomoke - Nassawango IBA in Maryland this spring to try to get a prothonotary warbler.

#19 Shoveler26

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:20 AM

Wow looks like you can get a lot of birds there! There is a Place in IN called Goose Pond that has Black Bellied Whistling Ducks in every year but i have never gotten the chance to go there and see them!

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#20 Melissa :)

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:34 AM

Bombay Hook is a reliable place to find American Avocets and Black-necked Stilts. I see the stilts every time I go, but no avocets. I swear, I think they just don't like me!! :P

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