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Bird on my back porch


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#1 dowlf

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 01:50 AM

This evening there has been a bird perched on my back porch for several hours. It doesn't fly away even when approached at a close distance.

I am in Topeka, KS and today is May 31, 2012.

I am kind of worried about the bird since it doesn't fly away, it could be an easy target to one of the neighborhood cats.

I have a feeling he flew a long way today and is just really tired, but that is just a guess.

Thanks for any help identifying the bird.

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#2 Liam

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 01:56 AM

Welcome to Whatbird. That's a juvenile American Robin. I'm sure it'll be fine on its own.

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#3 mtdavid

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:29 AM

Well, juvenile Robins do have fairly high mortality rates, and the adults will nest multiple times each year to make up for it. Of course, adults often allow close approach as well, I think they're just not very shy birds.

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#4 ColoTomo

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:45 AM

Good points Liam & mtdavid. However, my own experience is that 'wild' juvenile Robins (as opposed to ones I dealt with in rehab) could get pretty upset and feisty upon TOO CLOSE of an approach, despite their relative lack of shyness.

TO dowlf: If the bird is still around tomorrow and you don't see parents coming and feeding it, see if you can approach close enough to capture it. If the bird easily gets away, let it be, it's fine. If the bird allows you to capture it by hand, I'd recommend taking it to a bird rehab, and they will release it after the bird is strong enough to fly on its own.
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#5 dowlf

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:15 AM

Thanks for the information, the bird is still in the same spot, so I will give ColoTomo's advice a try.

#6 ColoTomo

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 05:38 AM

Please let us know how it turns out
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#7 Totah Sam

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 09:44 PM

Look like you scared the cr..... wow... nice Robin. :P
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#8 dowlf

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 02:39 AM

Later that day the bird was still there. I was watching it from the window for a few minutes, when one of its parents showed up and gave it some food. Then they both flew off. Haven't seen a robin since in my back yard.




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