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Condors and lead bullets


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#1 Desertthorn

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 11:50 PM

http://www.wired.com...ts/#more-117607

#2 creeker

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 05:43 AM

Lead bullets are already banned in the entirety of the Condors range here in California. The sad fact about the California Condor now is that it is basically a domesticated bird. There is no longer enough of a food source to support a population of them. The fire lookout tower mentioned in the article is one of the places where they leave food for the "wild" Condors to eat. Not to mention almost all if not all of the chicks are taken from the nest and raised by humans. All of the "wild" birds are fitted with gps transmitters. In my eyes, the real California Condor went extinct when they trapped the last wild one on Easter Sunday in 1987. From what I've seen working with other injured raptors, cars are a way bigger threat to the non-condor raptors than ingesting lead bullets . Maybe we should ban cars. :huh: I've never seen a lead poisoned raptor, that I'm aware of. Sometimes the writers of these articles have hidden agendas. Just something to consider.
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#3 Desertthorn

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:28 PM

It was an article I picked up from the ABA, That is interesting to know. I thought the Condor population was expanding and florishing, but if what you say is true, RIP Raptors and cars is another thing, like geese and airplanes I guess.

#4 cwj2323

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 02:26 PM

From what I've seen working with other injured raptors, cars are a way bigger threat to the non-condor raptors than ingesting lead bullets . Maybe we should ban cars. :huh: I've never seen a lead poisoned raptor, that I'm aware of. Sometimes the writers of these articles have hidden agendas. Just something to consider.


Here in Iowa, lead poisoning is a growing problem for raptors. One of the rehab places this winter got its first lead poisoned Cooper's hawk. Fall of 2011 saw its first dove hunting season and our governor refused to allow a ban on lead shot. Doves injured by lead or those who digested lead shot as gristle can become eaten by the Cooper's.

Here is a video I ran into recently.
SOAR video

I am not trying to debate as I know cars are a big problem, but we are reading of too many eagles and other raptors dying from lead poisoning and it can be prevented.

Edited by cwj2323, 27 June 2012 - 02:30 PM.

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#5 spookyjimjams

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 04:30 PM

Another problem that Condors face is deaths from intestinal blockages due to eating trash. I did not know this until recently, but chicks have died from intestinal blockages after their parents fed them things like bottle caps and other trash. Apparently Condors are attracted to shiny bits of stuff on roadsides when they are eating roadkill.

A few weeks ago I was able to watch 3 condors eating a dead whale. While it lasts, these birds will have lots of food. I imagine that ocean delivers treats on a semi-regular basis, be it whales, seals, etc.

This site is from the Ventana Wilderness Society for Big Sur and has tons of information on each of the birds in the area.

http://www.mycondor.org/

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#6 creeker

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 05:27 PM

Another problem that Condors face is deaths from intestinal blockages due to eating trash. I did not know this until recently, but chicks have died from intestinal blockages after their parents fed them things like bottle caps and other trash. Apparently Condors are attracted to shiny bits of stuff on roadsides when they are eating roadkill.

A few weeks ago I was able to watch 3 condors eating a dead whale. While it lasts, these birds will have lots of food. I imagine that ocean delivers treats on a semi-regular basis, be it whales, seals, etc.

This site is from the Ventana Wilderness Society for Big Sur and has tons of information on each of the birds in the area.

http://www.mycondor.org/


The beach used to be the condors prime feeding area. But now, development right down to the coastal bluffs, the fact that dead sea mammals are carted off as soon as found, and just a preponderance of human traffic, keeps the condors from getting this necessary food source. My opinion is that this is why they can't make it here on their own anymore, and why they must be fed by man.
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#7 spookyjimjams

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 06:24 PM

The beach used to be the condors prime feeding area. But now, development right down to the coastal bluffs, the fact that dead sea mammals are carted off as soon as found, and just a preponderance of human traffic, keeps the condors from getting this necessary food source. My opinion is that this is why they can't make it here on their own anymore, and why they must be fed by man.


Big Sur does have a decent amount of development, but little to none is near the beaches, they are just too difficult to access from the cliffs. Of all of the birds in the Big Sur/Pinnacles area that I have read about, all of the deaths are either from unknown causes or lead shot. In May alone, they lost one to lead poisoning, and had 2 sent to the LA Zoo for treatment. I have not read of birds going hungry, although I have heard of the feeding programs. I read that the feeding programs were there to give them a lead-free option, not to sustain their nutrition.

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#8 JimBob

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:16 PM

.
Here is a video I ran into recently.
SOAR video


I'm never using another lead pellet. . . and I'm not joking. :mellow:

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#9 creeker

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 05:35 AM

Surprised I haven't succombed to lead poisoning. I'm sure I've ingested more lead shot than most condors. Plus as kids we used to bite our lead sinkers closed on our fishing lines. Hmmmm, maybe that's why I'm an underachiever? :blink:
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