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A pair of Loons, at ISO 160


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#1 canon eos

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 01:34 PM

I shot this pair a few days ago.
For bird photography especially there are two schools of thought for camera settings, being all-to-mostly AUTO, and mainly Manual.
I grew up with all manual as there wasn't any Auto to speak of, and most Auto settings were quite crude by today's standards. Bird photography, and BIF in particular is quite challenging as there are so many things going on, causing endless variables.
For my particular circumstances using a Canon T2i (light, competent) and Canon 400L (light, tack-sharp wide open) I normally reduce the variables by shooting aperture priority, f5.6 (wide open) and take whatever shutter speed I get. I usually use Auto-ISO capped at 1600. But sometimes, as with this image, the ISO auto-'selected' causes too low a shutter speed, for my liking. I prefer closer to 1/1000 for birds, if possible.
I sometimes manually set the ISO at 800, sometimes use Auto-ISO (capped at 1600). I don't sit in blinds or use a tripod/support so my variables are always changing so I try to second-guess my options.
Sometimes with great success, sometimes not. But that''s the case with any camera, lens, support and situation.


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#2 Joejr14

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 09:59 PM

Michael, here is a perfect example of why I love my monopod so much. Sure, I can hand hold the 500mm (I did it for almost all my alaska pictures) but using the monopod gives me back several stops of exposure. Also, I feel totally comfortable shooting at 1/250 if I've got the rig on the monopod as opposed to hand holding.

Obviously ISO 1600 is tough on most sensors, as it obviously is here. Though it's much worse on the background as opposed to the birds, so I would assume you could tweak a good deal of the noise out in post processing. If the bird at the bottom of the image had been looking at you, instead of away from you, this could have been a killer!

#3 canon eos

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 12:25 AM

Thanks Joe for your input. (actually this was shot at ISO 160 vs 1600!)
I have introduced some 'noise' in PP for effect and its result is subjective.

I very much appreciate any and all input.




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