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The Bane Of Birding


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#1 Benjamin DeHaven

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 12:38 AM

The only thing that makes these guys bearable (besides bug spray) is the knowledge that just about every bird will gobble one of these down in a second. This Greenhead Fly was at Bombay Hook NWR in Delaware on 6/25/10 along with millions of its friends.


Posted Image
DSC_8915 by BadBirds, on Flickr

Anyone else?

Benjamin DeHaven

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#2 BarnSwallow

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 01:07 AM

I HATE those things! When they land on horses, the horses go nuts before they even bite, because they know what they are. You can smack one, it will fall off, and lie upside down. Then a few minutes later, it'll start twitching, then turn over and fly away! Zombie flies!

#3 canon eos

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 01:32 AM

The only thing that makes these guys bearable (besides bug spray) is the knowledge that just about every bird will gobble one of these down in a second. This Greenhead Fly was at Bombay Hook NWR in Delaware on 6/25/10 along with millions of its friends.


Posted Image
DSC_8915 by BadBirds, on Flickr

Anyone else?

Benjamin DeHaven


Wow, I love it!
The photo, that is :)

#4 Aveschapines

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 04:48 AM

Zancudos (nasty little mosquitos) in Panajachel. They are tiny and don't hurt when they bite you, but 2-3 days later you erupt in swollen, maddeningly itchy bites with a small scab in the middle. Over the next two weeks they develop little blisters which later break open and weep, get huge and swollen, and itch like crazy.

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#5 Benjamin DeHaven

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 12:09 AM

I'm afraid I don't have the stomach to look up Zancudos, I don't do well with others wounds. That sounds a bit like Chiggers (not sure the "actual" name) which lay either eggs or larva in the wound which then form their own breathing tube and release enzymes which do not allow the wound to heal and that produces a very itchy situation. Man I hate bugs...

Benjamin

Motivational Thought Of The Moment: "The most dangerous risk of all, the risk of spending your life not doing what you want on the bet you can buy yourself the freedom to do it later.� - Randy Komisar

 

Life List: 303 ** ABA 2014: 189 ** Maryland Life: 240 ** Maryland 2014: 120 ** Baltimore Life: 186 ** Baltimore 2014: 88 ** Delaware Life: 153

2013 Sightings (ebird rank): ABA: 260 (2405th) ** Maryland: 212 (81st) ** Baltimore: 169 (20th) ** Delaware: 127 (101st)


#6 TheBillyPilgrim

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 12:20 AM

I'm afraid I don't have the stomach to look up Zancudos, I don't do well with others wounds. That sounds a bit like Chiggers (not sure the "actual" name) which lay either eggs or larva in the wound which then form their own breathing tube and release enzymes which do not allow the wound to heal and that produces a very itchy situation. Man I hate bugs...

Benjamin


Just to let you know, that whole "burrowing-larva-in-your-skin" thing about chiggers is an old wives tale. They just bite you like most other critters :)

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#7 meghann

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 12:37 AM

In my yard, when I'm watching the hummingbirds, I have to contend with azalea plant bugs, because we have a ton of azalea plants. Most people don't even know they exist, until they get bitten by one. Stings like a fire ant, and then itches worse than a mosquito, and I get little pus filled blisters from them. "Charming" little bugs.

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#8 Benjamin DeHaven

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 03:33 PM

Well TheBillyPilgrim, you are correct (though I think you already know that). I stand corrected and slightly less grossed out by them. ;)

Benjamin

Motivational Thought Of The Moment: "The most dangerous risk of all, the risk of spending your life not doing what you want on the bet you can buy yourself the freedom to do it later.� - Randy Komisar

 

Life List: 303 ** ABA 2014: 189 ** Maryland Life: 240 ** Maryland 2014: 120 ** Baltimore Life: 186 ** Baltimore 2014: 88 ** Delaware Life: 153

2013 Sightings (ebird rank): ABA: 260 (2405th) ** Maryland: 212 (81st) ** Baltimore: 169 (20th) ** Delaware: 127 (101st)


#9 TheBillyPilgrim

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 03:38 PM

Well TheBillyPilgrim, you are correct (though I think you already know that). I stand corrected and slightly less grossed out by them. ;)

Benjamin


Being a biologist is good for something, occasionally :)

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#10 creeker

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 03:45 PM

We don't get too many Mosquitoes or biting flies here, but we do get ticks in the backcountry. I usually encounter them when hunting, since I am pushing through the brush. Nothing worse than looking down and seeing about 30 of them crawling up your pants leg!
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#11 spyonabird

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 09:37 PM

Once I stepped in a nest of Deer Ticks while hiking. I must have had over 100 of the biting disease carrying little buggers removed from my body by tweezers - one...by one...by one. Not a fun experience.
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#12 creeker

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 10:18 PM

The good thing (if there can be one with ticks) is that the ticks here are fairly large and slow. They like to crawl upward. Eventually they get to your neck and you can feel the little buggers crawling there, and easily pick them off. I've gotten into the habit of changing into a t-shirt and shorts after hunting, and putting my clothes straight into a plastic trash bag, then straight into the wash when I get home. That way I don't bring home any "presents" to the wife and child.
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#13 spookyjimjams

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 07:08 AM

Once I stepped in a nest of Deer Ticks while hiking. I must have had over 100 of the biting disease carrying little buggers removed from my body by tweezers - one...by one...by one. Not a fun experience.


The good thing (if there can be one with ticks) is that the ticks here are fairly large and slow. They like to crawl upward. Eventually they get to your neck and you can feel the little buggers crawling there, and easily pick them off. I've gotten into the habit of changing into a t-shirt and shorts after hunting, and putting my clothes straight into a plastic trash bag, then straight into the wash when I get home. That way I don't bring home any "presents" to the wife and child.


Now that I have a dog, I have had to embrace the ritual of tick removal. I have never really had a problem with them while birding though. I tend to bird on wide paths and I don't end up brushing up against grass too much.

I would be very unhappy if I had to deal with deer ticks. Lyme Disease is no joke. Luckily here in CA we have mostly dog ticks, and like Creeker said, they are easy to deal with.

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#14 SuzanneO

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 08:11 PM

Just to let you know, that whole "burrowing-larva-in-your-skin" thing about chiggers is an old wives tale. They just bite you like most other critters :)

In Panama, there are bot flies and there is one that uses humans as host to their larvae: Dermatobia hominus. I would suggest the weak of heart not google images :lol:.
When I first got here, I kept seeing the Howler monkeys with these horrible 'volcano' wounds. They would dig at them and lick their fingers. I wondered what was wrong with them. Then a fellow sailor/naturalist told me about an Aussie sailor here who had a 'worm' come out of a wound on his head. Pretty gross.

I got 'seed' ticks several times this year. The first time, I didn't know what they were, and I was freaking out big time. Here is my blog post about it:
http://birdingaboard...seed-ticks.html

I also just posted about the Golden Orb spiders whose webs I occasionally run into. I have to admit, I don't like spiders!

I guess birding in the wilds is worth it, huh?




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