Bird Brain

Small Eurasian Collared Dove.....Or Ringed Turtle Dove??

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Spotted this one hiding in our flower bed yesterday when I went out to put bird seed on the feeder. I walked up to within 8-10 ft. of it and it showed no fear of me. I tossed some seed out to it and it began to eat immediately as if used to being fed. All the while it kept looking up skyward as if it was afraid of an aerial assult by a hawk or something else. It ate for a few minutes then hopped up on a decorative concrete border.

Size of a Mourning Dove, definitely smaller than a Eurasian Collared Dove. (I have EC Doves daily at the feeder). Looking in my Sibley's, this Dove looks like a Ringed Turtle Dove. Though out of range for here, I'm thinking it could be an escapee, especially since it was so tame. Notice its white head contrasting with body color, and pale primaries, as opposed to dark primaries on a EC Dove.

Thoughts, anyone?

8537583070_d09224ca38.jpg

1-Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 018 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

8536484661_8a335aed6e.jpg

1-Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 028 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

8536482325_6e3f0b8ebf.jpg

1-Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 019 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

8537639002_b0eb9f35b3.jpg

Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 025 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

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Looks like a Ringed Turtle Dove. They're pretty much escapees everywhere -- there was a small population in Joliet, IL for awhile, and Sibley's shows a small population in Los Angeles, but I would imagine that any persistent population is being supplemented with escapes.

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Spotted this one hiding in our flower bed yesterday when I went out to put bird seed on the feeder. I walked up to within 8-10 ft. of it and it showed no fear of me. I tossed some seed out to it and it began to eat immediately as if used to being fed. All the while it kept looking up skyward as if it was afraid of an aerial assult by a hawk or something else. It ate for a few minutes then hopped up on a decorative concrete border.

Size of a Mourning Dove, definitely smaller than a Eurasian Collared Dove. (I have EC Doves daily at the feeder). Looking in my Sibley's, this Dove looks like a Ringed Turtle Dove. Though out of range for here, I'm thinking it could be an escapee, especially since it was so tame. Notice its white head contrasting with body color, and pale primaries, as opposed to dark primaries on a EC Dove.

Thoughts, anyone?

8537583070_d09224ca38.jpg

1-Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 018 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

8536484661_8a335aed6e.jpg

1-Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 028 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

8536482325_6e3f0b8ebf.jpg

1-Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 019 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

8537639002_b0eb9f35b3.jpg

Peyen Road 3-5-13..Collared Dove..Cooper's 3-7-13 025 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr

Funny story about this bird and it's being so tame.

About 1997, I headed a community project to remove (what turned out to be about 50+ tons or so) of arrundo donax (that nasty invasive, water sucking, horrible, awful creek species that clogs the creeks and drives the native willow etc. out) out of our creeks. I worked for almost nine weeks straight organizing crews of people up to 70 at a time, directing traffic, arm waving (!) and feeding everyone lunch. My leg was in a brace from surgery, so I did the running and organizing for it and helped at the roadside.

Among those who helped was the county's minimum security fire crew for about a week (anything to get outside, I guess). This was excruciating work (especially in the heat) where everything was cut with chainsaw, then HAND delivered up extremely steep slopes via human chain, then put into a county shredder.

Once, the jail crew was near my own home and the ringed turtle doves (we have a population here and have for a couple decades) came down and so close they could almost be touched. The inmates were just wild about these birds and asked why they were so friendly (not knowing they weren't endemic birds.

I just told them this was a pretty magical place (which it is, actually) and that we all just get along. It was nice to see these guys enjoy the wild even if what they were seeing wasn't really "wild".

I heard from the county leader of the group that these guys came both for the food and the birds. How cool is that? :)

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Great story, cany! Nice to hear that they enjoyed the birds and looked forward to seeing them. I'm sure they didn't have much, if anything, else to look forward to on a day-to-day basis.

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Great story, cany! Nice to hear that they enjoyed the birds and looked forward to seeing them. I'm sure they didn't have much, if anything, else to look forward to on a day-to-day basis.

No kidding. Most of them were probably "in" for drug infractions. We weren't really supposed to talk to them (I didn't know that at first).

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I've had one of these, or at least a hybridxEUCD the last couple of years. My photos never seem to capture the contrast between its nearly-white color and that of the EUCDs it hangs out with, though. From the breeding season "activity" I've observed, it's definitely a female, and so will be producing some other hybrids. From what I've read, the Ringed Turtle Doves are generally wedding escapees.

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Before the Eurasian Collared Dove explosion here, I used to see (and even caught two) of these Ringed Turtle Doves. They are (or were) commonly kept in aviaries here. All the ones I've seen have been quite tame.

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my brother in law used to have one as a pet. they called it "bird". it used to walk around the floor, come up to people and start cooing that their feet.lol he was a great bird.lol

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