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Restart Bird Identification Expert

What was the CROWN COLOR of the bird with the All-purpose bill and the Brown iris colored eyes you saw in Texas?



Black-billed Magpie: Large, noisy jay, mostly black, with very long tail and dark, stout bill. Wings and tail are iridescent blue and green-black. White belly and sides. Eats insects, larvae, carrion. Direct flight on shallow, steady wing beats. Often glides between perches or from perch to ground.
Clark's Nutcracker: Medium, noisy and inquisitive jay with pale gray head and body. Black bill is long and stout. Wings are black with white patches and tail is black with white edges. Feeds on nuts, insects, eggs and young of other birds, lizards, carrion and small mammals. Steady deep wing beats.
California Gull: This is a medium-sized gull with a white head and underparts, gray wings and black wing tips. The bill and legs are yellow, and it has a red eyering. It has a strong direct flight with deep wing beats. It feeds on worms, mice, other birds and their eggs, and garbage. The sexes are similar, but the males are usually larger than females, with a larger bill, head and tarsi.
Glaucous-winged Gull: This large gull has gray upperparts with white underparts, head and neck. The eyes are dark and the bill is yellow with a red spot on the lower mandible. The wings are gray with white edges and spots near the tips. The legs and feet are pink. It feeds on fish, small birds, or almost anything. It has a powerful direct flight and often soars on thermals. The sexes are similar.
Western Gull: This large gull has gray upperparts, white head, neck, tail and underparts, yellow eyes, a bright yellow bill with red spot near tip and pale pink legs and feet. It has gray upper wings, white-edged with white-spotted black tips. Diet includes fish, crabs, clams, eggs, carrion and garbage. It has a direct flight; strong, steady wing beats; soars on thermals. Sexes are similar.
Black-bellied Plover: This medium-sized shorebird has black upperparts vividly marked with a white spot on each feather. It has a black face, throat and belly and white forehead and crown that extends over the eye, down the back and sides of the neck. Vent and wing stripe visible in flight. Strong direct flight with powerful rapid wing beats. Feeds on marine worms and insects. Sexes are similar.
Lewis's Woodpecker: Medium woodpecker with dark green-black upperparts and hood. Face is dark red, collar is gray, belly is pale red. The bill, legs and feet are black. It was named for Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Its dark plumage sets it apart from all other North American woodpeckers.
Williamson's Sapsucker: Medium-sized woodpecker with black back and white rump. Bright red throat, breast is black, belly is yellow, and flanks are barred black-and-white. Black head has two white facial stripes. Black wings have large white shoulder patches. Tail is black, legs and feet are gray.
Dusky-capped Flycatcher: Small Myiarchus flycatcher with olive-brown upperparts, white and red-edged wing feathers, brown tail. Throat and breast are pale gray and belly is pale yellow.Feeds on insects, fruits and berries. Rapid flight with shallow wing beats. Sallies to snatch insects in flight.
Varied Thrush: Large thrush, dark gray upperparts, rust-brown throat, breast, sides, eyebrows, black breast band, and white belly and undertail. Wings are dark gray with two rust-brown bars. Tail is dark gray with white corners. Legs and feet are brown. Direct, swift flight on rapidly beating wings.
Cape May Warbler: Small warbler, olive-yellow upperparts, thick, black streaks on yellow underparts. Bright yellow face, chestnut-brown ear patch, black crown. Wings are dark with large white patches. First collected in Cape May, New Jersey in 1811 and not seen again in that area for over 100 years.
Black-throated Blue Warbler: Small warbler that is the most strikingly sexually dimorphic of all wood warblers. Male has dark blue upperparts, black throat and mask. White underparts with black sides and white wing patch at base of primaries. Bill, legs and feet are black. The female is olive-brown.
Blackpoll Warbler: Medium-sized warbler with black-streaked, gray upperparts, white underparts, and black-streaked white sides. Head has black cap and prominent white cheek patch. Bill is black. Wings are dark with two white bars. Pink legs and feet. Swift, direct flight with rapidly beating wings.
Greater Pewee: Large, plump flycatcher, olive-gray upperparts, white throat, gray breast, pale yellow belly. Slender crest. Broad, flat bill is two-toned: upper mandible is dark, lower is orange. Wings and tail are dark. Short flights on rapid shallow wing beats. Sallies out to take insects in air.
Red-faced Warbler: Medium-sized warbler with gray upperparts, white nape and rump, and paler gray underparts. Forehead, throat, and upper breast are bright red. The crown and ear patches are black. Gray tail is long and square tipped. Eats mostly spiders and insects which it finds in tree branches.
Thick-billed Kingbird: Large flycatcher with gray-brown upperparts, darker head, and seldom seen yellow crown patch. Throat and breast are gray-washed white, and belly and undertail coverts are pale yellow. Bill is large and black. Tail is gray-brown and slightly forked, edged with cinnamon-brown.
Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher: Large flycatcher with boldly streaked olive-brown upperparts and pale yellow underparts with dark brown streaks. Eyestripes are thick and black with white borders. The wings are dark and edged with white. Tail is rust-brown. Slow fluttering flight with shallow wing beats.
Pacific Golden-Plover: This medium-sized plover is yellow-spotted. It has a dark brown back, black face and black underparts with white-mottled flanks; a white S-shaped mark extends from above the eye to along sides. It has a thin, short black bill and black legs and feet. Females are duller in color. Diet includes insects, worms and spiders. Swift direct flight with rapid, steady wing beats.
Black-legged Kittiwake: This is a medium-sized white gull with pale gray back and upperwings and black wing tips. The bill is yellow and the legs and feet are black. It has a swift, graceful flight, alternating several rapid shallow wing beats with a glide. Hovers over water before diving for prey at the surface. It feeds on marine invertebrates, plankton and fish. The sexes look very similar.
Heermann's Gull: Medium-sized gull with gray underparts and dark gray upperparts. Head is white and bill is bright red with black tip. Tail is black and edged with white. Legs and feet are black. Dives into ocean to catch fish. Also steals and scavenges. Flight is bouyant and direct.
Sabine's Gull: Small gull with gray back and white nape, rump, and underparts. Hood is solid black and eye-ring is dark red. Bill is black with yellow tip; legs and feet are black. The upperwings are gray with black primaries and white secondaries. Tail is slightly forked when folded.
Black-headed Gull: Small, white gull with partial hood, white crescents above and below eye, and white-gray back. Red bill. Wings with black tips and black bases of primaries. Sexes similar. Non-breeding adult lacks hood, black mark behind eye, and black tip on bill. Juvenile like winter adult but more black on wing and tail with black tip.
Little Gull: The smallest of all gulls, with pale gray upperparts and white nape, neck, breast, belly, and tail. Hood is black and extends onto upper neck. Underwings are dark. Bill is dark red with black tip. Legs and feet are red-orange. Strong direct flight with deep wing beats.
American Dipper: Small, wren-like bird, dark gray with short, cocked tail, white eyelids that flash when blinked. Straight black bill. Wades, swims and dives for food. Feeds on aquatic insects, larvae, clams, snails, crustaceans, and small fish. Strong direct flight on rapid wing beats.
Flame-colored Tanager: Tropical tanager, flame red-orange body, black wings with white wing bars and spots, black-streaked back. Face has pale gray-tinged ear patch bordered with black. Female is olive-green above, olive-yellow below, and has black wings. Bill is gray, legs, feet are black. Swift, direct flight.
Streak-backed Oriole: Large oriole with mostly bright orange body except for black streaks on back. Deep orange-red head and breast contrast with black face, chin. Black wings with two bold white bars. Black tail with white corners. Eats mostly insects. Strong direct flight with rapid wing beats.
Black-capped Chickadee: Medium-sized, stocky chickadee with pale gray upperparts and breast and pale olive-brown underparts. The black cap and bib and white cheeks are conspicuous. Black bill is short and thin. Wings are dark with broad white edges on feathers. State bird of Maine and Massachusetts.
Fan-tailed Warbler: Small, secretive warbler, dark gray upperparts, red-brown underparts, white-tipped tail. Head has yellow throat and small crown patch, white eye crescents. Walks on the ground rather than hop. Undertail coverts are white. Short, weak flight on rapidly beating wings.
Olive Warbler: Medium warbler, gray back, rump, and uppertail coverts, and white belly and undertail coverts. Head, throat, nape and upper breast are orange-brown; mask is black. Wings are black, two broad white bars. Tail is notched and dark gray with white edges. Black legs, feet.
Bohemian Waxwing: Large waxwing with gray upperparts, pink-gray crest, black mask and chin, and gray underparts. The wings are black with a sharp yellow or white line and red spots on secondaries (visible when folded). Tail is dark and yellow-tipped with cinnamon-brown undertail coverts.
Northern Wheatear: Small thrush (oenanthe), with gray upperparts, black wings, mask, and tail. Underparts are white, and buff-brown wash on throat. Dark gray back and nape. Very active bird, nervous and restless while foraging. Bobs tail and often makes short flights to hawk insects.
Gray Kingbird: Large flycatcher with gray upperparts, black mask, inconspicuous red crown patch, and mostly white underparts with pale yellow wash on belly and undertail coverts. Bill is long and black. Wings and notched tail are dark. Fluttering direct flight on shallow wing beats.
Piratic Flycatcher: Small olive-brown flycatcher has brown crown, white face with dark eye-line and moustache stripe, white throat shading to pale yellow on belly, and faint dark streaks on breast, sides. Dark wings have two bars; pale feather edges. Dark tail has pale feather edges.
Brown Noddy: This medium-sized tern is brown except for the white forehead blending to a gray nape and a small white lower half-eye ring. Its wedge shaped tail has a small notch at the tip. It has black legs and feet and a long slender bill. It has a strong swift flight with steady wing beats. It often flies with erratic changes of direction. It feeds mainly on fish and squid. The sexes are similar.
Gull-billed Tern: Lightest North American tern. Black cap that extends below eyes, down nape; pale gray upperparts that are darker at the wingtips; short, stout black bill and black legs, feet; long wings with very long outer primaries. Direct flight with graceful, shallow wing beats.
Buff-breasted Flycatcher: Smallest Empidonax flycatcher; fresh adult has gray-brown upperparts and pale underparts washed with yellow and cinnamon. White eyering is distinct; two wingbars are white. Short bill with black upper mandible and yellow to pink lower mandible. Legs and feet are gray-black.
Pacific Wren: Formerly grouped with the Winter Wren, this bird is now considered its own species. A very small wren with barred, dark brown upperparts and buff eyebrows. May appear rufous brown. Brown underparts are lightly barred on flanks, belly, and undertail. Tail is very short and held upright. Sexes are similar.
 
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