Tips for using Browse:

Browsing is a valuable way to learn about birds, however it is a brute force approach and not designed for identification. A more sophisticated approach to finding a bird with specific field marks is to use the Step by Step Search. You can also try the Wizard to find a bird, which uses a question and answer approach, but again it does not give you the flexibility of the Step by Step Search.

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American Goldfinch
American Goldfinch: Male is a small, noisy finch with a bright yellow body, black cap, wings, and tail, and white rump and undertail coverts. Wings have flashy white patches and bright yellow shoulder bar. Bill is pink and conical. Female is duller with olive back and lacks black cap and yellow shoulder bars. Winter male has olive-gray to olive-brown upperparts, paler underparts, yellow shoulder bar, white wing bar, dark bill, and may show black on forehead and yellow on throat and face. Winter female is duller with buff wing and shoulder bars, and lacks yellow and black on face and head. Juvenile resembles winter female but has yellow wash on throat and breast.
American Crow
American Crow: Large, black bird with dark, stout bill, iridescent violet gloss on body, and blue-black wings. Tail is fan-shaped in flight. Eats insects, small invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles and mammals, eggs and young of other birds, grains, fruits, refuse, and carrion. Steady direct flight.
American Robin
American Robin: Large, familiar North American thrush, gray-brown upperparts, rich red-brown breast, and white lower belly and undertail coverts. Head appears black with white splotches surrounding the eyes, and throat is white with black streaks. Juvenile has heavily spotted underparts. Swift, direct flight on rapidly beating wings.
American Pipit
American Pipit: Small pipit, gray-brown upperparts and pale buff underparts; breast is faintly to darkly streaked. Tail is dark with white edges. Black bill is thin and long. Legs and feet are black. It can be distinguished from sparrows by its longer bill and habit of wagging its tail up and down.
Arctic Warbler
Arctic Warbler: Medium-sized, active warbler with stout bill, olive-green back, olive-brown sides, and white throat and belly. Dark eye-lines contrast with pale yellow eyebrows curving upward behind eyes. Wings have faint pale bar on tips of greater coverts. Tail is square. Pale yellow legs, feet.
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Ash-throated Flycatcher: Medium flycatcher with gray-brown upperparts, pale gray throat and breast, and gray-brown tail with rufous highlights. The pale yellow belly distinguishes this species from other Myiarchus flycatchers. Bill, legs, and feet are black. Strong flight with shallow wing beats.
American Redstart
American Redstart: Medium, active warbler with black upperparts and hood, distinctive orange-red patches on wings, sides, and long, fanned tail, and white underparts. Bill, legs, and feet are black. Female has gray head and gray-olive upperparts and white underparts with yellow on flanks and tail. It frequently flashes its colorful wings and tail to flush insects from foliage.
American Dipper
American Dipper: Small, wren-like bird, dark gray with short, cocked tail, white eyelids that flash when blinked. Straight black bill. Wades, swims and dives for food. Feeds on aquatic insects, larvae, clams, snails, crustaceans, and small fish. Strong direct flight on rapid wing beats.
Altamira Oriole
Altamira Oriole: Largest North American oriole, bright yellow-orange body, black back, mask, bib, and tail. Bill is black. Wings are black with white bar and feather edges. Gray legs and feet. Feeds on caterpillars, insects, fruits, and berries. Swift, strong flight on rapid wing beats.
Alder Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher: Small flycatcher with olive-brown upperparts, white underparts, and indistinct white eye-ring. Wings are olive-brown with two white or pale bars. Bill is short with orange lower mandible. Black legs and feet. Weak fluttering direct flight with shallow, rapid wing beats.
Audubon's Oriole
Audubon's Oriole: Large oriole with yellow-green upperparts, black hood extending onto upper breast, and lemon-yellow underparts. Wings are black with a single white bar and white-edged feathers. Tail is all black. Swift and direct flight with rapid wing beats low under the canopy.
American Tree Sparrow
American Tree Sparrow: Medium, gray-brown sparrow, black and rufous-brown streaks on back, wings. Crown, eyestripes, flanks are rufous-brown, contrasting with gray face. Pale gray breast with dark central spot, rufous-brown sides. Upper mandible is dark gray, lower mandible is yellow.
Acadian Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher: Small flycatcher with olive-gray upperparts, pale gray throat, distinctive pale yellow eye-ring, white lower breast, and faint yellow wash on belly and undertail coverts. Wings are olive-gray with two buff wing bars. Long broad-based bill with yellow-orange lower mandible. Black legs, feet.
Aztec Thrush
Aztec Thrush: Large thrush, dark-streaked, brown-black upperparts, head, upper breast. Underparts are white with dark brown mottled flanks. Wings are dark with white shoulders and tips. Dark tail with broad white tip. Pink-gray legs, feet. Swift direct flight on rapidly beating wings.
Asian Brown Flycatcher
Asian Brown Flycatcher: Small gray-brown flycatcher with white underparts, gray-brown wash on sides, breast. Long gray-brown wings have faint, pale wing bar. Black bill with creamy pink base to lower mandible. Gray face has a white buff eye-ring, lores. Dark gray tail has white undertail coverts.
Abert's Towhee
Abert's Towhee: Large, stocky, shy sparrow. Distinct black face, pale gray bill, gray-brown upperparts, paler gray-brown underparts, and rust-brown vent. Tail is long and darker than upperparts with rust-brown undertail coverts. Short flights, alternates rapid wing beats with wings pulled to sides. May be difficult to spot because it prefers to stay well-hidden under bushes.
Akohekohe
Akohekohe: This medium-sized black bird has a white-gold crest on its head and an orange eye ring extending to the orange-red nape. The breast and throat feathers are gray-tipped, and orange-tipped feathers are spread over the body. The wings and tail have white edges. The legs and bill are black. It feeds on nectar, insects and spiders. It has a direct strong flight. The sexes are similar.
Apapane
Apapane: This is a small songbird with dark red plumage overall, a white vent and underbelly, and black wings and tail. The black bill is medium in length and decurved. It has an undulating flight, alternating several rapid wing beats with wings pulled to the sides. Apapane are primarily nectarivorous but occasionally take insects and spiders. Both sexes look similar.
Akekee
Akekee: This is a small, mostly olive songbird with yellow on the crown, cheeks, throat and underparts. It has a black mask around the eye and a bluish bill with a slightly decurved culmen. The bill works like scissors to cut open buds in search of insects to eat. It also feeds on the nectar of some trees. The sexes are similar, but the males are slightly brighter. It has an undulating flight.
African Silverbill
African Silverbill: This small pale tan songbird has finely vermiculated buff-brown upperparts, white underparts and dark wings. It is paler on the belly and vent and has a stout, pale gray conical bill and a pale gray eye ring. It feeds mainly on seeds. It has an undulating flight. The sexes look similar.
Akikiki
Akikiki: This is a small songbird with dark gray upperparts, paler brownish gray underparts and white on the breast and throat. It has a short pointed, pink bill and pink legs and feet. It forages by hopping along tree trunks to find food such as arthropods. It has an undulating flight. The sexes are similar.
Anianiau
Anianiau: This is a very small songbird with yellow or green-yellow plumage and yellow edging on the feathers, wings and tail. They have beige legs and feet and a beige, slightly decurved bill. As well as eating arthropods, these honeycreepers drink nectar from flowers. Males are brighter in color than females. They have an undulating flight.
Akiapolaau
Akiapolaau: This small songbird has an olive back and rump, yellow head with black lores, and yellow underparts with a white underbelly and vent. It has a slender, decurved upper mandible. Females are smaller and paler than males. It drills deep holes in ohia trees to drink the sap within. It also uses its unique bill to pick out arthropods from beneath the bark. It has an undulating flight.
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