Tips for using Browse:

Browsing is a valuable way to learn about birds, however it is a brute force approach and not designed for identification. A more sophisticated approach to finding a bird with specific field marks is to use the Step by Step Search. You can also try the Wizard to find a bird, which uses a question and answer approach, but again it does not give you the flexibility of the Step by Step Search.

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Ashy Storm-Petrel
Ashy Storm-Petrel: Small seabird, gray-black overall, dark bill, forked tail. Gray wash on underwing coverts are visible at close range. Legs and feet are dark gray. Unlike most storm-petrels, it doesn't travel far from colonies after breeding. Flight is fluttering and direct on shallow wing beats.
Black Storm-Petrel
Black Storm-Petrel: Small seabird, brown-black overall with long, dark wings showing pale bar on upper side, and forked tail. The hooked bill is dark and has a tube on top. Legs and feet are black. Flight is mothlike with deep, steady wing beats. Comes closer to shore than most other storm-petrels.
Band-rumped Storm-Petrel
Band-rumped Storm-Petrel: This is a black-brown storm-petrel with gray-brown wing bars and a conspicuous white band across the rump and large, slightly notched tail. It has a black bill, legs and feet. It has a buoyant, zigzag flight, alternating several rapid wing beats. It feeds on invertebrates, small vertebrates and sometimes carrion from the water's surface. The sexes are similar.
Matsudaira's Storm-Petrel
Matsudaira's Storm-Petrel: Medium, black-brown storm-petrel with buff-brown patch on upper wing, and small white U-shaped patch on base of primaries. Wings are long and pointed. Medium black bill has small tube on top. Fairly long, strongly forked tail. Both sexes and juvenile similar.
White-faced Storm-Petrel
White-faced Storm-Petrel: The only Atlantic storm-petrel with the combination of dark gray upperparts and white underparts with a dark cap and eyeline. Long black legs trail behind squared tail in flight. Webbing between toes is yellow. Alternates rapid, shallow wing beats with stiff-winged glides.
Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: Medium storm-petrel, blue-gray upperparts, pale gray underparts. Forehead is dark gray, eye patch is gray. Primaries are darker gray than other flight feathers. Forked tail, feathers are narrowly white-tipped. Alternates rapid, shallow wing beats and stiff-winged glides.
Leach's Storm-Petrel
Leach's Storm-Petrel: This medium-sized petrel has a dark brown body and a white rump and under tail feathers. The wings are dark with a pale gray-brown bar on the upper wings. It has a long, dark forked tail, and a black bill, legs and feet. Its flight is bounding and erratic with frequent changes of direction and speed. It mainly feeds on fish, squid and shrimp. Sexes are similar. The Leach's Storm-Petrel now has two subspecies, the Townsend's Storm-Petrel and Ainley's Storm-Petrel. Split in 2016 by the American Ornithologist Union. Both are outside of North America.
Least Storm-Petrel
Least Storm-Petrel: Small, very rare storm-petrel with dark black-brown body and short, wedge-shape tail. The wings have black wing tips and pale brown diagonal bars visible in flight. It is the smallest Pacific storm-petrel. Flight is swift and direct on deep wing beats. Often flies low over water.
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Wilson's Storm Petrel: This small storm-petrel has a brown-black body, pale brown wing bands and a large, white rump. It has a fine black bill with very pronounced tubes. It feeds mainly on pelagic crustaceans and fish. The wings are short and rounded. The feet extend past the tail in flight. It has a direct flight with steady, shallow wing beats. The sexes are similar in size and coloration.
Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel
Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel: Small storm-petrel, black-brown overall with large white patch on rump and central tail. Bill, legs, and feet are black. Feeds far out to sea. Flight is swift and direct, with deep wing beats and much banking and twisting. Often flies high above the surface of the water.