Tips for using Browse:

Browsing is a valuable way to learn about birds, however it is a brute force approach and not designed for identification. A more sophisticated approach to finding a bird with specific field marks is to use the Step by Step Search. You can also try the Wizard to find a bird, which uses a question and answer approach, but again it does not give you the flexibility of the Step by Step Search.

 ALL  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 
Barred Owl
Barred Owl: Medium, large-headed owl with large, brown eyes, concentric rings around pale face, no ear tufts. Upperparts are brown with white markings. Underparts are white with dark bars on breast and dark streaks on belly. Heavily streaked, spotted, and variegated brown, white, and buff overall.
Burrowing Owl
Burrowing Owl: Small ground-dwelling owl, mostly brown with numerous white spots and no ear tufts. Eyes are yellow. White chin and throat. Tail is short, and legs are long. Bouyant, erratic flight with slow, silent wingbeats. May hover briefly above prey. The scientific name means "little digger."
Belted Kingfisher
Belted Kingfisher: This medium-sized bird has a bushy crest, white collar and large, black dagger-like bill. It has blue-gray upperparts, white underparts and gray legs and feet. Males have one blue band across the white breast, while females have a blue and chestnut band. It hovers above water to search for prey such as crayfish and frogs. Slow direct flight with an erratic pattern.
Black Swift
Black Swift: Large, bulky swift, black overall. Wrist (wing angle) is very close to body. Long, slightly forked tail, often fanned out. It is the largest North American swift. Spends most of its time thousands of feet in the air. It flies on stiff, shallow wingbeats. Soars on thermals and updrafts.
Black Tern
Black Tern: This small tern has a black head, bill and underparts. The back, wings and tail are silver-gray, and the vent is white. The legs and feet are dark red but may appear black. It has a buoyant, direct flight with deep rapid wing beats. It hovers for insects in an uneven foraging flight. It plunge dives on occasion. The sexes appear similar.
Black Noddy
Black Noddy: Medium-sized tern, very dark brown-black with white cap, white (lower) half-eye ring, and long slender bill. Wedge shaped tail has small notch at tip. Sexes are similar. Juvenile appears more brown, white cap is more distinct.
Brown Noddy
Brown Noddy: This medium-sized tern is brown except for the white forehead blending to a gray nape and a small white lower half-eye ring. Its wedge shaped tail has a small notch at the tip. It has black legs and feet and a long slender bill. It has a strong swift flight with steady wing beats. It often flies with erratic changes of direction. It feeds mainly on fish and squid. The sexes are similar.
Buff-breasted Flycatcher
Buff-breasted Flycatcher: Smallest Empidonax flycatcher; fresh adult has gray-brown upperparts and pale underparts washed with yellow and cinnamon. White eyering is distinct; two wingbars are white. Short bill with black upper mandible and yellow to pink lower mandible. Legs and feet are gray-black.
Blyth's Pipit
Blyth's Pipit: Buff-brown to Streaked black-brown above; wings are tipped buff with two pale wingbars. Tail is black-brown with rufous tinged central feathers; buff below and orange-buff on flanks, vent and undertail. Upper breast has dark streaking, cream colored supercilium extending behind the eye with thin black moustachial stripe and broad buff submoustachial stripe, narrow black malar stripe. Female is similar and juvenile is paler and has white wingbars and feather tips.
Home |  SearchBrowser | Expert | Forum | Help | Site Map  
© 2002 - 2008  Mitch Waite Group All rights reserved. Privacy Policy. Service Agreement.  
Percevia® Registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
Field guides, illustrations, and database Copyright © 2004 - 2013. Mitch Waite Group.
Whatbird parametric search. This product and/or its method of use is covered by one or more of the following patent(s): US patent number 7,363,309 and foreign equivalents.
The best bird guide and bird watching search engine to identify birds in the world!
Whatbird.com logo design courtesy of The Haller Company
Web01 10/19/2019 08:19