Tips for using Browse:

Browsing is a valuable way to learn about birds, however it is a brute force approach and not designed for identification. A more sophisticated approach to finding a bird with specific field marks is to use the Step by Step Search. You can also try the Wizard to find a bird, which uses a question and answer approach, but again it does not give you the flexibility of the Step by Step Search.

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Crested Caracara
Crested Caracara: Large, ground-dwelling falcon, black body, finely barred tail, wing panels and upper breast. Head crest is black, facial skin is red, and large bill is blue-gray and hooked. Legs are long and yellow. Strong steady wing beats alternated with long to short glides. Soars on thermals.
Canada Goose
Canada Goose: This long-necked goose has a large gray-brown body, large webbed feet and a wide flat bill. It has dark upperparts, paler underparts, a white vent, cheeks and chinstrap, and a black head and neck. Strong deep wing beats. Strong powerful direct flight. Flies in a in V formation in migration. Feeds on grasses, sedges, berries and seeds. Sexes are similar, but males are larger.
Chimney Swift
Chimney Swift: Medium-sized swift, uniformly dark brown with slightly paler throat and upper breast. Inconspicuous spines extend past web at tips of tail feathers. Bill, legs and feet are black. Flight is rapid and batlike on swept-back wings, alternates with gliding. Soars on thermals and updrafts.
Clark's Grebe
Clark's Grebe: Large grebe, gray-black upperparts, white underparts, and slender neck with white on front and black on back. White face, black cap extends nearly to red eyes. Bill is yellow-orange. Until the 1980's thought to be a pale morph of the Western Grebe. Direct flight on rapid wing beats.
Common Nighthawk
Common Nighthawk: Medium nightjar with white-speckled, dark upperparts, black-and-white barred underparts, mottled breast, white throat. Wings are long, dark gray with white bars, nearly covering tail when folded. Gray-brown legs and feet. Darting erratic flight with frequent changes of direction.
Cook's Petrel
Cook's Petrel: This small petrel has a slate-gray back and upperwings marked by a black M-pattern, white underparts, under wings, and face with a small dark eye patch, black bill, blue-gray legs and feet, long slender wings, and a gray tail with black-tipped central feathers and white edges. It feeds mostly on fish and squid. Rapid and erratic flight. Sexes are similar.
Chinese Egret
Chinese Egret: Population is seriously declining due to competition for living space with humans and other egrets. White overall with shaggy crest, blue-green lores, orange-yellow bill, and black legs with yellow feet. Has been seen feeding on mudflats and tidal flats with other egrets and herons.
Cape Verde Shearwater
Cape Verde Shearwater: Large seabird with gray-brown upperparts, dark brown flight feathers, and white underparts. Light pink bill is fairly long and thin with a dark ring near the slightly hooked tip. The wings are long and the tail is medium in length. Flies with rapid stiff wing beats alternated with short glides.
Channel-billed Cuckoo
Channel-billed Cuckoo: Large gray cuckoo with straw colored tip on black-gray bill. Slate gray back, medium-gray head and breast, and white-gray belly and vent. Red around eye. Long, pointed wings with black spots. Long tail with black tip. Female has more barring below and smaller bill. Juvenile has smaller bill and buff edging to feathers in wings.
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