Tips for using Browse:

Browsing is a valuable way to learn about birds, however it is a brute force approach and not designed for identification. A more sophisticated approach to finding a bird with specific field marks is to use the Step by Step Search. You can also try the Wizard to find a bird, which uses a question and answer approach, but again it does not give you the flexibility of the Step by Step Search.

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Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl: Large, white owl with variable black bars and spots. The head is round and lacks tufts, eyes are yellow, and the bill is black. Feathered feet and toes provide protection from the arctic cold. Direct flap-and-glide flight with powerful, deep wingbeats. North America's only all-white owl.
Spotted Owl
Spotted Owl: Medium owl, white-spotted, brown upperparts, finely barred white underparts. Head lacks ear tufts. Eyes are brown. The wings are brown with white spots. A secretive bird, it inhabits dense old growth forests. An individual needs 3000 acres to survive due to scarcity of its food source.
Swainson's Hawk
Swainson's Hawk: Large hawk, dark brown upperparts, white throat, rufous upper breast, pale buff underparts. Tail is gray with faint bars, dark terminal band, and white trailing edge. Yellow legs, feet. Alternates series of powerful deep wing beats with long glides. Soars on thermals and updrafts.
Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret: This is a medium-sized, totally white egret with a long slender black bill and yellow lores. The eyes are yellow, the legs are black, and the feet are bright yellow. The head, neck and back have long lacy plumes during breeding season. The diet varies but includes crustaceans, insects and fish. Buoyant flight with steady fast wing beats. The sexes are similar.
Surf Scoter
Surf Scoter: This medium-sized diving duck is entirely black except for white patches on the forehead and nape. It has an orange, black and white bill, white eyes and orange legs and feet. The female is less distinctly marked with smudgy face patches and dark bill. It dives for food, primarily mollusks and crustaceans. Rapid direct flight with strong wing beats. Flies in straight line formation.
Snow Goose
Snow Goose: This large goose has two color phases. The White phase is all white with black wing tips. The Blue phase has a white head and neck, blue-gray upperparts, gray-brown breast and sides, white belly, pink bill, legs and feet and black lower mandible. Sexes are identical within each phase. Diet includes pasture grasses and grains. Strong direct flight in bunched flocks or U formations.
Steller's Eider
Steller's Eider: Small eider with black back and collar, white sides, buff-brown underparts with small but distinct black spot on side. White head has a dark tuft, black eye patch and chin. Wings are white with black primaries and a white-bordered blue speculum. Blue-gray bill, legs and feet.
South Polar Skua
South Polar Skua Dark: This small, gull-like skua occurs in two color phases. Dark phase adult has a dark brown body with a large white patch at base of primaries visible in flight. Dark bill, thick and heavy; short, broad tail. Light phase adult has pale gray-brown head and underparts. Feeds on fish, krill and squid. Strong direct flight with shallow wing beats. Sexes are similar.
Sooty Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater: This large bird has a dark gray-brown body, darkest on the tail and primaries. The under wing coverts are pale. The bill is long and dark, and the legs and feet are black. It eats fish, squid and crustaceans. Its long narrow wings are slightly swept-back. It alternates strong direct flapping with long glides. The sexes are similar.
Short-tailed Shearwater
Short-tailed Shearwater: This medium-sized shearwater has a dark brown body and traces of white in the center of the upperwings. It has a short dark bill and dark gray feet that trail slightly behind the rounded tail in flight. Feeds primarily on crustaceans. Alternates strong flaps with long glides; often soars for long periods. Sexes are similar.
Streaked Shearwater
Streaked Shearwater: This large shearwater has scaled, dark gray-brown upperparts, white underparts, pale bill and white forehead. White head has variable light to heavy pale brown streaks. Upper tail coverts can be white, forming a pale horseshoe. Legs and feet are pink. Feeds on small fish and squid. Flies with loose angled wings. Light, graceful flapping and gliding. Sexes are similar.
Sharp-tailed Grouse
Sharp-tailed Grouse: Medium grouse with lightly barred brown upperparts and white underparts dotted with chevrons. Head has short crest, yellow-orange eye comb, and pink or violet neck patch exposed when displaying. Tail is pointed and white-edged. Often seen on prairies in the summer.
Swallow-tailed Kite
Swallow-tailed Kite: The largest of North America kites, has black upperparts which contrast with white head and underparts. In flight it shows long pointed wings with black flight feathers and white wing linings. Has a 15-16 inch-long black tail with deep fork. The neck, breast and belly are white.
Snail Kite
Snail Kite: A large bird, dark blue black overall with extremely hooked thin black bill with reddish base. In flight shows a white tail with broad dark distal band and narrow gray terminal band. Long legs are bright orange or red. Feeds on snails. Flies on slow shallow wing beats followed by glides.
Spectacled Eider
Spectacled Eider: Smallest of the Eiders, has orange bill, white upperparts, black underparts, breast, sides, black pointed tail, yellow-green head and large white "goggles" bordered with black. White feathers on the upper mandible extend past nostril. Rapid direct flight in straight line formation.
Slaty-backed Gull
Slaty-backed Gull: This large gull has a slate-gray back, white head, belly, tail, and upper wings; dark outer primaries separated from mantle by row of white spots. Gray underside of primaries; broad white trailing edge to wings. It has pink legs and feet, yellow eyes with red orbital ring and a yellow bill with red spot near tip. Diet includes fish, crustaceans and insects. Sexes are similar.
Sooty Grouse
Sooty Grouse: Large, chicken-like bird, dark gray to blue-gray with yellow-orange eye comb, black tail with wide pale gray terminal band. Patch of yellow skin with red veining on neck surrounded by white feathers is displayed during courtship. Formerly (with Dusky Grouse) known as the Blue Grouse.
Scarlet Ibis
Scarlet Ibis: This nervous and wary South American species was introduced in Florida and is unmistakable with its bright scarlet plumage, pink skin on face, pink bill and red legs. Black primaries are seen only in flight. Often breeds with the White Ibis producing various shades of pink offspring.
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo: Large white parrot with white-yellow feathers in long crest, white-yellow at base of flight feathers in wings, and yellow-white at base of the feathers in the tail. Black-brown eye. Strongly-downcurved black bill. Fairly long, broad wings. Medium-length, rectangular tail. Female has more red-brown eye. Juvenile like adult.
Striated Heron
Striated Heron: Small, stocky, gray heron, black cap, short black line below eye. Gray-black streaks on back. White throat, white and orange-brown streaks on breast. Medium, straight black bill. Medium, yellow legs and feet. Sexes similar. Juvenile black-brown with white and buff streaks on breast and crown, and buff edging to feathers in wings.
Spectacled Owl
Spectacled Owl: Large owl, black-brown upperparts and breast, white throat, rest of underparts buff. Small black-brown facial disk with white outline near bill and eyes. No ear tufts. Eyes yellow. Broad, rounded wings, barred tail.
Swan Goose
Stejneger’s Scoter
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