Alan Barnard

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About Alan Barnard

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 11/24/61

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  • Website URL
    www.aroundthebirdfeeder.net

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    : California

Recent Profile Visitors

134 profile views
  1. Our friendly neighborhood California Scrub Jay. Such a character...
  2. Acorn Woodpeckers, Northern California
  3. White-Crowned Sparrow
  4. Lesser Goldfinch, Northern California
  5. American Bushtit, Putah Creek Riparian Reserve.
  6. White-Crowned Sparrow
  7. Mourning Dove
  8. A scruffy little White-Crowned Sparrow.
  9. Our local California Scrub Jay
  10. Anna's Hummingbird Here's a story about the image. For some reason, I had my camera set on single shot, not my usual 8 frames per second. During the half second the bird was in front of me, I lifted my camera, pressed the shutter once, and captured a single frame. This image was the result. The fact that I was able to capture it was pure luck.
  11. Our local neighborhood California Scrub Jay
  12. A pair of Lesser Goldfinches tussling at the feeder.
  13. The first birds that came to our feeders were a small flock of Lesser Goldfinches. There were probably a half dozen to start, and the group quickly grew to between 25-30. The number peaked one morning after an all-night rain storm. I awoke to the sound of 40-50 chattering finches in the tree outside our bedroom. They were so loud I thought the neighbors might complain, but within the next week or so, the entire flock pretty much cleared out, leaving fewer than a half dozen visiting on a regular basis. I spoke to one of our local experts about why they might have left, and she said it could be anything from a predator such as a neighborhood cat or a Sharp-shinned Hawk, to the presence of a bird such as a Northern Flicker, to a change in feeding patterns due to an increase in natural food availability. We did have a hawk chase after a house finch one day, and a Flicker dropped by briefly another day, but I haven't seen any predators lurking around on a regular basis. Any guesses as to why our large flock disappeared? Is the abundance of natural food sources this time of year the most likely culprit? I'm in Northern California.