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Donny

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About Donny

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  1. Trying to identify a bird

    The whistle we’ve been going crazy trying to identify was a grackle! Here’s a video. It does its regular slide whistle a couple of times and then at the end does the double whistle.
  2. Trying to identify a bird

    It’s a little close to the queedle queedle sound, but it sounds almost like it’s swallowing the end of the queedle for a lack of a better description. I guess it might be a jay if it’s modifying its call or imitating another birds. Blue jays have nested in that tree in the past. I wish I were more an expert on the sounds. So far the queedle queedle seems to be the closest at this point. Thanks again!
  3. Trying to identify a bird

    I’ll check out the different blue jay sounds online. We do have blue jays in the backyard, but I usually recognize them from the kind of screech call.
  4. Trying to identify a bird

    Thanks for responding! That’s not it, but what a beautiful bird! I figured out how to upload my video to YouTube so that I could post the link on here. This is it:
  5. Trying to identify a bird

    I uploaded to YouTube - here is the link to my 4-second video.
  6. Trying to identify a bird

    Thank you for responding! - that’s not it, but some of the whistles are closer in pitch to the black-crested titmouse, unless there are some of its whistles I haven’t found online yet. It almost seems like I’ve heard this bird in the Caribbean - which doesn’t make sense. I also thought for a little bit that it might be some kind of tree frog. But we are a long ways from the islands.
  7. Trying to identify a bird

    Thank you, I will try that!
  8. We’ve been hearing a bird whistle from our sycamore tree the last few days (April 10-13, 2018) here in Arlington, Texas. We live in a suburban area with a very large yard. The whistle is one short high followed by two medium-long lower tones. It’s not high pitched like a black capped chickadee or white throated sparrow. Here is a 4 second video just for sound that I uploaded to YouTube.
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