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Aveschapines

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Aveschapines last won the day on December 14 2012

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About Aveschapines

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  • Birthday June 30

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    : Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

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  1. Warbler and oriole

    Agree with Black-Throated Green Warbler; study the face pattern of Townsends, easy to confuse; but Bl Th Green has less contrast on the mask around the eyes and more black on the throat (speaking of adult males). As to your oriole, I don't know if it's a Yellow-Tailed; I've only seen one, but according to Howell and Webb a juvie should have a light bill, and an immature more black on the throat and the broad yellow wingbar, even though it's less noticeable with the lighter wing. I also can't see if the upper tail has yellow edges, whcih is diagnostic. If I saw this one I'd probably call it an immature Black-Vented. Are they in range there? They are variable from one place to another, though, so hard to say.
  2. Small beige sparrow like bird

    Welcome to WhatBird! Maybe a non-breeding American Goldfinch? What did its bill look like?
  3. Hummingbird feeder

    OK I managed to get some of these brushes (a set of 3) and they are AMAZING! A few swipes with the brush and all clean, instead of half an hour fiddling with toothpicks and bamboo skewers and knowing I didn't get it all. Thanks for the tip!
  4. Welcome to WhatBird! I moved your post to the World Birds thread. It won't drop out of sight as quickly here and hopefully someone will be able to help you with your ID. It's a lovely bird!
  5. My house burned down

    I'm sorry you have to go through this, but glad you have a place to live with birds The things are gone, but the memories are yours to keep forever. Take care.
  6. Gray Hawk

    Thanks @psweet I wasn't thinking about juveniles.
  7. Gray Hawk

    Gray Hawks are also ligher and less marked overall:
  8. Confirm Ruby-throated Hummingbird

    They should definitely look smaller than Berryline's if you see them together. Could be a Ruby-Throated; maybe some better hummer experts can help. Great photos!
  9. Confirm Ruby-throated Hummingbird

    I'm not convinced on Ruby-Throated either, given the lack of the white postocular spot, lots of black around the eye, thin short bill, and short wings (I would expect the wings to be as long as the tip of the tail). Were you able to get a size comparison? Rubies are tiny; all of my locals totally dwarf them.
  10. mystery birdwing

    Yep. It's a bird-eat-bird world out there, although I admit the first time I saw a predator digging into its fresh-caught meal it was a House Sparrow (lunch for a Kestrel) instead of a Yellow Warbler or Gray Silky-Flycatcher.
  11. mystery birdwing

    I would assume a larger predator bird dropped it on your balcony. Maybe they were having breakfast there and you startled them...
  12. Unknown Bird

    Just so you're clear, we get a very limited upload allowance; anyone who posts on a regular basis will run out soon. You'll need to use a third-party photo hosting site for photos, too.
  13. Welcome to WhatBird! This is a very old discussion, so I wouldn't expect to hear back from the original poster. And on a side note: I have not seen any evidence that bees have a problem with the color red; my red hummer feeders have been covered with hundreds of bees at times. I have had success with covering the feeder ports with a thin layer of vegetable oil. Feeders with longer ports also help, but it does mean other birds have trouble using the feeders.
  14. A White Northern Mockingbird

    Ah! So it's a Mockingbuddy! Welcome to WhatBird. Very cool bird, photos, and story!
  15. One Plover or the other?

    Well, local birders have also commented that it's a nice find for here too. Guess I've been lucky the two times I was there! Another much more experienced birder said he'd been to the same beach many times and never seen one; I've been twice and seen a lot of them each time. (Locals also confirmed Collared.)
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