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asque2000

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asque2000 last won the day on May 23 2016

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About asque2000

  • Rank
    Dr. Sethie D.
  • Birthday 01/08/85

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Biddeford, ME
  • Interests
    Birding (obviously), camping, biking, photography

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  1. Woodpecker & Accip

    I was going to call it a Coop based on the size of the terminal band in photo 1, but then I saw it's face with that small head and bug eyes, I think it fits better for a Sharpie.
  2. Shorebird confirmations

    1. Yes, 2. Yes, 3. Looks better for Black-bellied Plover. I mean maybe the first there could be enough contrast between the supercilium and cap on the bird on the right, but usually it’s really obvious.
  3. Indigo Bunting?

    On my morning walk I was in an area that is awesome for Yellow-rumped Warblers, and this bird popped up. To be honest it sounded a lot like the YRWAs but it didn't fit the bill (couldn't help myself with that one). Anyway, my best guess is and INBU. Any thoughts? INBU by Seth Davis, on Flickr
  4. I would guess a Purple Finch based on the second photo.
  5. Other birds recently helped

    This is a cross post from your post on the Bird ID forum: I would caution you from handling birds to this extent in the future. I know it seems to you that the bird is relaxed and calm, but that is very far from actuality. To the bird you are a predator and handling them too much can cause release of stress hormones and subsequently blood pressure to increase (imagine if you were hurt and a Grizzly bear or something came and started to nuzzle you or something), and if you already have a compromised system as a result of a window strike this can greatly increase the risk for hemorrhages and death. The best thing to do if you find a window strike bird is put it in a loosely opened box and allow it to recover in a safe temperature sensitive area (i.e., if it's hot out, put it in shade, if it's super cold place them in a warmer area).
  6. Bird I found at work - Sept 06 2017

    I would caution you from handling birds to this extent in the future. I know it seems to you that the bird is relaxed and calm, but that is very far from actuality. To the bird you are a predator and handling them too much can cause release of stress hormones and subsequently blood pressure to increase (imagine if you were hurt and a Grizzly bear or something came and started to nuzzle you or something), and if you already have a compromised system as a result of a window strike this can greatly increase the risk for hemorrhages and death. The best thing to do if you find a window strike bird is put it in a loosely opened box and allow it to recover in a safe temperature sensitive area (i.e., if it's hot out, put it in shade, if it's super cold place them in a warmer area).
  7. white collared seedeater and Myrtle yellow rump

    I think it has a yellow throat, so I’d go Audubon’s
  8. Swainston's Thrush ????

    Yes, Swainson’s. The easiest way to post photos is to upload them to Flickr. Click the share button and copy the BBCode and past that into your post here. You only have limited photo storage on the forum itself, but with Flickr you can post full resolution shots
  9. Calling all Hummer Lovers!

    My favorite Rufous/Allen's shot Rufous Hummingbird by Seth Davis, on Flickr
  10. please confirm Lincoln's sparrow

    1. is good for a Lincoln's Sparrow, 2. I'm kinda getting a female Purple Finch vibe off of this one. I don't know where in Mexico this was taken but perhaps someone else can chime in on this.
  11. Binocular opinions

    I know this is a couple months late but I hope my 2 cents are worth it. Unlike cameras, where you can buy an entry-level DSLR and compare it to a $1-2K camera and you can physically see what modifications/features are different between the buying levels, with optics the only thing to improve is visual quality. I can say from my own experience that looking through a $300 pair of Nikons and comparing it to Swarovski there is a world of difference. The Swarovski's are cleaner, crisper, and are far more satisfying to look though. That's not to say the Nikon's are bad, but visually there is a big difference, and as mentioned, it's a personal decision if you feel that viewing experience is worth it to you. I nor anyone can answer that for you. Now to expand on your question we should break things down to levels, entry-level $100-400, mid level $500-1K, and premium $1K-2.5K. As mentioned, I feel there is a noticeable quality difference between entry-level and premium, however I haven't been able to really notice much, if any, difference between any of the premium brands (i.e., I can't definitively say Leica's, Zeiss', or Swarovski's best bins are better than another) so in that regard it comes down to comfort and price effectively. But even more interestingly is that many of the mid level binoculars are really stepping up their game. For instance a friend let me borrow her Nikon Monarch 7s and they were super binoculars for their price ~$700. There are a lot of those out there where if you had a premium bin owner and you sat them in front of the mid level bins they probably could not tell the difference visually. Other things like build quality, weight, and/or customer services may be compromised for cost savings, but you can still get a great image and not have to spend a ton of money. So my advice is to really try out anything before you buy it. Sometimes stores even have the resolution charts that really help to show where potential visual aberrations exist. Binoculars are the most important tool in a birder's kit so you certainly want to be happy with what you have.
  12. I have a good lens cleaning kit, but note that my (and many other objective lenses) are set back so it makes it difficult to clean thoroughly by hand. Granted most objectives don't get grime all over them so you certainly don't need to clean them as often. My question, which has been answered, is whether or not distilled H20 is safe to use to occasionally clean off dust specifically on the objectives.
  13. Which Thrushes are these?

    Hmm... my apologies for the mis ID on the first. I agree now it’s a Swainson’s. This time of year they’re pretty uncommon here in ME so my mind defers to a Hermit.
  14. Which Thrushes are these?

    They both looks good for Hermit Thrush
  15. Another Duck in Maine

    Thanks, I was hoping with that patch at the base of the bill it’d fit for Blue-winged Teal.
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