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Shadow-Syl

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About Shadow-Syl

  • Rank
    Absolutely Cuckoo
  • Birthday 02/25/1998

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Kansas
  • Interests
    Everything to do with nature. I love and find great interest in all animals and plants! But if I had to pick, it would be birds. I enjoy nature photography, traditional art, writing, fishing and gaming.

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  1. Raptors N' Ducks

    Unfortunately that is the only shots I got of the bird, as it didn't stay around too long. Thank you for the help though! I was also thinking that about the rufous tones. Anyhow, I thought I would add this: I put that falcon up on a Hawk ID Facebook group just for double (more like triple) checking and have just checked on it to see a lovely Prairie Falcon vs Peregrine Falcon debate playing out! There's been convincing reasons for both. Peregrine: "Facial pattern is Peregrine (mustache too bold and not angled enough for Prairie), a little less tail-y than Prairie (a tad shorter and more tapered/thinner to tip), lighter back and shoulders darken outboard to flight feathers - primaries darkest (Prairie more consistently toned)." "Long pointed wings, long tail, heavy "moustache" mark.... I can even make out a bluish cere if I zoom in, which, combined with a somewhat brownish topside would indicate a juvenile bird, I believe." Prairie: "Brown back & upper wings, prominent malar, plus range maps make a large falcon where you are much more likely to be a Prairie rather than Peregrine." Then one other person said Prairie without giving field marks." Still wanna lean on Peregrine, of course. I'm feeling less confident that the bird can be separated confidently from Prairie though. Should I still put it in ebird as Peregrine, or leave it as large falcon sp?
  2. Raptors N' Ducks

    Thank you, I appreciate the help so so much! Thank you for even including the possible years for the Bald Eagle, I am not well-versed in the aging of Bald Eagles yet but want to get better. Peregrine Falcon is a lifer if that's what it is!! One of my nemesis birds! I didn't even think about it being a peregrine, as (according to ebird) they seem to be rare this time of year, plus I just have no experience with them. Don't worry about number 5, I am sure a more western/central birder will come around hopefully for that one.
  3. Raptors N' Ducks

    All taken earlier today (Jan 20) in south-central Kansas. The forecast was quite cloudy which means some bad photos (even though it did clear up later in the day). Thank you in advance for all help and information! 1. Common Goldeneye with some leucistic/piebald feathering? Was integrated in with Common Goldeneyes, mergansers and Mallards in a bit of open lake water that was unfrozen. 2. Common Merganser females? Also with goldeneyes and mallards in open lake water. 3. Immature Bald Eagle with the white armpits? I think these are all of the same bird, although the first shot was taken in a different area than the rest, it really looks like I ran into the same eagle unless they are just the same age/molt. It may not be easy to tell with the quality of these photos but would this be a hatch year (1st year) bird or close to it since it is so dark? 4. Is this ID-able? Falcon species? It flew rather low over the water extremely fast and even getting this shot was lucky though I'm not sure it's good enough for ID. Unfortunately I didn't get a good view of the underside of the bird since it disappeared so fast, all I could tell is that it seemed light underneath. It was a similar size to the goldeneye ducks it flew over, maybe just a bit bigger than them. I'm not sure if it was planning to hunt the ducks, but they got pretty nervous regardless of how small the raptor was since it flew so close to them. It was in the same habitat as the ducks, over open water of the lake with dense forested area surrounding. I have found a goshawk in this same area a month ago, so that might help give a vivid image of the habitat haha. 5. Western (Calurus) Red-tailed Hawk? Or Harlan's? If able to tell from these shots? Just wanted to make sure since Western shows up as "rare" for this area.
  4. Ross's Geese Questioning

    I didn't even consider CANG/CACG X SNGO/ROGO, I can see what you mean though with your descriptions. Should just leave these things as goose sp on ebird LOL (they are just at Snow/Ross's now). This might be a dumb question but since I am pretty sure there were at least two of these, is it possible they are from the same clutch and ended up traveling together? Or is that not a thing that happens?
  5. Ross's Geese Questioning

    I noticed the smaller grin too but guessed it was because of variability. I usually don't have a problem with Ross's vs Snow but these ones are not so clear to me for some reason haha.
  6. Ross's Geese Questioning

    In my opinion I think both look equally cute and innocent and I just want to cuddle them both! Though I guess I feel that way about every bird.
  7. Ross's Geese Questioning

    Quick response, thank you! You're probably right, the heads just looked so rounded to me that I just assumed Ross's, and I didn't think the bill was long/bulky enough. I realize it might be angle tricks though. I'm glad I had them double checked.
  8. Confirm/ID

    I didn't believe me even with a pic for awhile LOL.
  9. Taken in south-central Kansas. Thank you in advance for the help! 1. These were taken November 19, I originally had them as pure Ross's Geese and didn't think much of it which was before I read that blue-morph Ross's Geese are apparently super rare a few days ago. They have been accepted into ebird as Ross's Goose but I am wondering if they aren't in fact Ross's x Snow Geese, though it's weird that there were two different ones in the same area. Or, are these in fact blue-morph Ross's Geese? Or is it just a wive's tale that blue morphs are rare and they are actually not all unusual? I can't seem to find a whole lot of info on them on google. I've noticed one of these has a longish beak and a more developed grin patch then typical Ross's I see though. I think the bird in the second, third and last photo are the same individual. It seems I only got one photo of the first individual but I am sure they are two separate geese. I'm just really curious about it all so any information and help is appreciated! 2. And a bonus Sharpie vs Coop taken on Jan 8, though I am pretty sure this is a Sharpie but I just thought I'd make sure. It was in a good Sharp-shinned habitat, forested area flying over a meadow.
  10. Juvenile Grebe in Northern California

    To my eyes, the morphology fits better for Horned Grebe, with the not-as-steep forehead, nicely curved back, steeper-set rump and straight, stout bill. Plus the white neck. I could be wrong though!
  11. Confirm/ID

    Thank you once again! I didn't even realize it was a great bird for KS! Though I was told they are probably a bit under-reported in Kansas due to the difficulty of finding one and the fact that no one believes you unless you have a photo, which luckily I did. Very very luckily.
  12. Confirm/ID

    Lol, I misread that through tiredness that day and thought that said Northern Harrier... I went back to the post to see it does indeed say Northern Goshawk and realize that's a lifer for me and I am now very excited! Thank you!
  13. Maybe not exactly on my feeder, but I once had a pair of Blue-winged Teal stop in a tree the feeders are attached to, then land by near them for a few minutes before taking off again back to wherever they were headed.
  14. WHAT IS THIS?

    Definitely a Rusty Blackbird, my favourite species of blackbird for sure. When I saw one for the first time I was just as confused as you. Great bird to have in your yard!
  15. Confirm/ID

    Wow, thank you both so much for all this help!! This is really helpful. Thank you for even identifying all the blackbirds, I wasn't even aware that there were Brown-headed Cowbirds in there!
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