• Announcements

    • Bigfoot

      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.
Lisa

Vile green inch worms

25 posts in this topic

Do birds eat the horrible neon green inch worms that dangle from trees by silk coming out of their vile little butts? They are *everywhere* right now. It's so bad that I'm refusing to use the back door to my house, be on the deck or even in the backyard. Last year, the back of my house was moving because there were so many.

If I collect them and kill them either in the microwave, oven or freezer, then add them to suet or even mix in with seed at the feeder.

-Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know, but it sounds disgusting!

OMG it is. I have a major bug phobia, like full-on panic attacks, and these things are high on my list of worst offenders, up there with roaches and camel crickets. I could never feed mealworms because they just freak me out. Bluebirds in my yard just aren't worth that. :D

-Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chickadees love those little green inchworms!  When I am gardening, I dig up all the grubs and place them in a dish on the platform feeder.  All the birds love them.  Especially the Cardinals during nesting season. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These worms provide a great meal for our returning warbles that should already be here in the states. God does provide for our birds. Things that seem gross, is a delicious meal for some of Our Feathered Friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These worms provide a great meal for our returning warbles that should already be here in the states. God does provide for our birds. Things that seem gross, is a delicious meal for some of Our Feathered Friends.

 

I know, but that doesn't mean I want them crawling on my head.  :lol:

 

-Lisa

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chickadees love those little green inchworms!  When I am gardening, I dig up all the grubs and place them in a dish on the platform feeder.  All the birds love them.  Especially the Cardinals during nesting season.

I would be interested in knowing if the chickadees will eat them if they are dead. Seems like a good idea to freeze some for the winter :).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in knowing if the chickadees will eat them if they are dead. Seems like a good idea to freeze some for the winter :).

Probably much easier to get a bag of oat and grow mealworms, there may seem a lot but how many can you collect one by one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in knowing if the chickadees will eat them if they are dead. Seems like a good idea to freeze some for the winter :).

Do you really want a bag of small green worms in your freezer next to your pistachio ice cream??

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lisa, they will be around for a while. Wear some kind of hat. LOL ;)

I just won't go outside. It's getting too hot for me now too. That's why I hate summer and love winter. Thankfully, I can watch my feeder very clearly, and even get good pics, from an upstairs window. Take that, nature! :lol:

-Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you really want a bag of small green worms in your freezer next to your pistachio ice cream??

Funny, but there is already "raptor food" next to my Chocolate Champion ice cream.  :)  We keep it there until we can get up to the rehabber. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched two Carolina Wrens hopping all over my husband's grill this morning, gobbling up these worms.  It was nice to see it clean.  :)

 

-Lisa

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These worms provide a great meal for our returning warbles that should already be here in the states. God does provide for our birds. Things that seem gross, is a delicious meal for some of Our Feathered Friends.

 

Amen :)

 

I prefer not to have to walk through them, but they don't last long.  I wouldn't know how to preserve them well, but I would suggest freezing, if anything.  Don't put them in the microwave.  You might try drying them, like mealworms.  Do you have a dehydrator?  If not, you might try putting some in the oven, on the lowest temp, for a few hours and see what happens?  Heck, I'm sure you can google how to preserve them for bird food.  I google everything LOL :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link to how to dehydrate mealworms, but I'm not sure those little green worms are thick enough to do all this with.  It's worth a try though, if you have more worms than birds to eat them now.  Like rpope15 said, God is providing them at just the right time for the birds that are migrating through, so they will attract migrants, which is a plus :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link to how to dehydrate mealworms, but I'm not sure those little green worms are thick enough to do all this with.  It's worth a try though, if you have more worms than birds to eat them now.  Like rpope15 said, God is providing them at just the right time for the birds that are migrating through, so they will attract migrants, which is a plus :)

Whoops, you forgot the link.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well... I do not know which is more vile...  green inch worms or grinding dehydrated mealworms to use in baking.  :P

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These inch worms, Lisa? :-P

5540971516_1a94d2f041_z.jpgTiniest inch worm ever by midgetinvasion, on Flickr

Yes. And you have now been added to my Ignore List. :P. (J/k)

There are two problems with these things: their overabundance now and the fact that they metamorphose into moths that cover my back door and screen porch in a thick blanket that vaporizes the instant they're disturbed. I'm not sure who eats the moths, but if anyone does, they don't eat enough.

-Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make some bug jugs that the moths are attracted to. 

 

1 gallon milk jug

1 cup sugar

1 cup vinegar

 

Mix those two.  The flies and moths do not seem as attracted if I do not mix. Not sure why. 

 

A cup or two of water.

1 banana peel

 

You can hang it from a tree or place it on the ground out of the wind.  Replace when it no longer seems to be working.  A warning, it really smells late in the season. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Another thing we want to try is building a bat house.  I know they eat a lot of bugs, but I am not sure what kind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now