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floraphile

APS-C vs. Full Frame

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Hi, All--

 

I am starting to shop for a new birding camera to replace my Canon EOS Rebel T1i, that I purchased years ago to primarily photograph family trips, etc.

 

After reading a few articles, I am leaning toward a full frame camera over an APS-C and wondered what the consensus among you all might be.  Is it worth the extra money?  

 

I assume my current Canon lenses will fit, if I get another Canon, is that a correct assumption?  

 

Thanks in advance.

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Hi floraphile

 

I’m not familiar with canon equipment but in general..... A full frame lens can be used on a APS-C sensor but an APS-C lens can not be used on a full frame sensor.  So if your lenses are APS-C (which I believe your camera is) you most likely would not be able to use them on a full frame sensor camera.

APS-C vs Full Frame.....These days the two are pretty comparable for the average photographer and it’s mostly a personal choice.  I prefer APS-C for sports and wildlife and the Full Frame for landscapes, night skies, etc., but they both work fine in most cases.

To me the lens quality is more critical and that is how I would spend my extra money.  If you go ASP-C remember those quality Full Frame lenses work great and you would be able to use them if you decide to go Full Frame later.  Have Fun

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One thing full frame sensors do best (in my opinion) is produce incredibly low noise at higher ISOs than cropped sensors. I think overall image quality will be better however there are some drawbacks. As mentioned, if you already have lenses that are for APS-C already, they won't work on a full frame sensor without serious vignetting, which you can crop out, but then you're basically just using and APS-C sensor again. If you already have full frame lenses, then you're made in the shade. Another perk of APS-C over full frame is the crop factor which I personally like because it appears if my subject is closer and it turns my 500mm lens into a 750mm equivalent lens. The last thing, and this may not be that much of an issue, but most full frame cameras are pretty big and heavy and if you're doing a lot of bird photography where you have to pack that stuff around it can be pretty heavy especially with a long lens. I would consider a "try before you buy" kind of deal so you can determine if it would be worth it and whether there are advantages you like etc. 

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Any Canon EF lenses will work on both full frame and crop sensor Canon Bodies.  If you have any EF-S lenses, they will only work on the crop bodies.  I believe all Canon "L" lenses are EF series.  I'll sometimes use my APS-C Canon 7D2 for the narrower field of view ("extra reach") if there is good enough light to keep the ISO down.  When light is low and you really need to up the ISO to keep shutter speeds up, full frame cameras produce much less noise. Some of the newest Canon zooms and teleconverters pair up nicely with minimal loss of IQ (i.e. 100-400mm II and TC 1.4 III). Everything eventually becomes trade-offs in size, weight, quality, price, etc.

 

Art

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