Jump to content
Whatbird Community Board
  • Announcements

    • Bigfoot

      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.
Colorado Owl

Local Patch

Recommended Posts

Hi all, 

Not sure if there is already a something like this, but I thought it would be interesting to have a thread where birders could share their local patch (possibly if you have an Ebird Hotspot for it?) and any rare/unusual birds they find in it. Enjoy!

 

Edit: My patch/hotspot is basically the town in which I live : http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L3609781

I've gotten a few nice birds there (Carolina Wren, Broad-winged Hawk, Cassin's Kingbird, and Rusty Blackbird).

Also I have just begun to bird a reservoir ~5 minutes from my house but it hasn't produced much: http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L4901357

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My patch isn't even an eBird hotspot, and I've seen twice as many bird species there as some of the neighboring hotspots. I found a SNGO sitting on my local pond with a flock CANG's, which is a pretty rare bird for this area

This hotspot is a half mile from my house: http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L2108573

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great idea.

My local patch is chiefly a riparian strip in the canyon behind me.  Recently my patch list has become just about as important to me as any other list.

A friend had seen a patch first Bald Eagle the other day, but I was stuck doing a CBC and missed it.  The next day I got a patch first Golden Eagle as a consolation.

Probably the best birds I've found there are Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Summer Tanager, Clay-colored Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, and Indigo Bunting. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L899956

 

EDIT:  Oh, and perhaps my rarest find there was not a bird, but a dragonfly.  Found first county record Filigree Skimmer last year.  Prior to that year there had only been two state records, but a handful were found in 2015.  Also saw another Filigree this summer - the only one in the state in 2016.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My patch is a couple of lakes and ponds along an open space trail. I get some nice habitats like a giant cattail marsh, and riparian woods. It's only a two minute bike ride from my house. 

 For Plaster Reservoir my best birds are: Swamp Sparrow, Bonaparte's Gull, Wilson's Phalarope, Black Tern, Eared Grebe, Sage Thrasher, and Greater Scaup.

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L473873?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

For McKay Lake, another lake in my patch, I've gotten: Snow Goose, American Tree Sparrow, Clark's Grebe, and Long-billed Dowitcher.

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L297379  

Other birds I've seen on the trail include Orchard Oriole, Least Flycatcher, Wilson's Snipe, and Plumbeous Vireo.

Cool Idea by the way!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think my workplace has become my current local patch.  i'm obsessed with trying to top the list for most species.  it is an ebird hotspot, but only has a handful of checklists. 

(you know you're an addicted birder when you sneak binoculars to work in your backpack)

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My patch consists of my neighbourhood, the golf courses bordering it, a river on the southern border, and a park technically outside of my neighbourhood, but close enough that I include it. Most weekends or days I don't have school I do my usual rounds, checking for anything unusual. I've become especially fixated on filling in the bar charts for the hotspots inside my neighbourhood. There's a group that does monthly surveys on one of the golf courses, but they haven't inputted all of their data into the eBird hotspot, so I try to cover as much as possible, as often as possible, so those are more complete. 

This is the hotspot I've birded the most, although I've been spending a lot more time on one of the golf courses recently. It was only made a hotspot in the past year or so, so I've been birding it a lot. 

The best bird I've found in my patch is definitely a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. It stayed around for a few weeks and a lot of birders saw it. Felt pretty cool to have so many birders coming down to see it! A couple weeks ago I also found a flock of Bohemian Waxwings, uncommon in Vancouver, and they gave pretty good looks for the birders that came looking for them. Other rare/uncommon species I've found are a Northern Waterthrush, Harris's Sparrow, Red-naped x Red-breasted Sapsucker, and Black-headed Gull (others found this in a different location, but I also saw it in my neighbourhood twice). Finally, I've also seen Tundra Swans, White-throated Sparrows, Chipping Sparrows, Green Herons, Lazuli Buntings, Pine Grosbeaks, and White-winged Crossbills in my patch. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have multiple patches, one for my home city and 2 for my cottage town. 

The one in my home city is basically my backyard. I have a small backyard and the park is just on the other side of our fence. It's called Sunnybrook Park and it's really huge, but the only place I really bird is by some stables and on a forested path with a ravine. I really should explore more of the park haha. Best birds found there (Not be me sadly, these were before I called it my patch) were a Townsend's Solitaire on 30 Dec 2015 (I so regret not going for this bird, but it was before I considered it my patch) and Black-backed Woodpecker in 2004. I haven't really found anything too good, but I've been able to add alot of patch firsts on ebird. Before I started birding there, the patch had 76 species, it's now at 111. I added alot of those, but others added some. Happy to say I'm the one that added the 100th species: Philidephia Vireo. I've seen 75 species at this park.

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1283787?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

 

My cottage patches:

1. Matchendash Bay. 133 species total for the hotspot, nothing too exciting. I honestly don't bird there too often anymore. I've only birded there in the summer when I've been up at my cottage. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1046614

2. Tiny Marsh. Some of the best birds there (none found by me) are Pacific Loon, Loggerhead Shrike, Western Meadowlark and Henslow's Sparrow. Again, a place I only bird in the summer when I'm up at my cottage.

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L384274

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My patch is also a local hotspot.  http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L387560  We walk the dog there every Sunday and I always bring my binoculars and usually my camera too.  I have gotten a few lifers there.  Warbling Vireo, Common Raven and Willow Flycatcher come to mind.  There is also a pair of nesting Red-Shouldered Hawks just off the trail.  

31747660446_2114c9b937_m.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My local patch is Jones Beach, one of the best places in the New York, if not the Northeast, for birding. It's only 20 minutes away by car. Notable bird species that have been found there (not by me) and are on eBird include Common Ground-Dove (a few years ago), White-winged Dove (which I chased unsuccessfully last May), American White Pelican (rare Jamaica Bay, exceptional elsewhere on LI), Golden-crowned Sparrow (1995), Cassin's Sparrow (2000), Black-tailed Gull (2001), Hammond's Flycatcher (2001), Mountain Bluebird (2004), Harris' Sparrow (2005), Smith's Longspur (2007), Yellow-headed Blackbird (2007), Sooty Tern (2011), Bridled Tern (2011) and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel (2011).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On December 19, 2016 at 8:32 AM, Colorado Owl said:

Hi all, 

Not sure if there is already a something like this, but I thought it would be interesting to have a thread where birders could share their local patch (possibly if you have an Ebird Hotspot for it?) and any rare/unusual birds they find in it. Enjoy!

 

Edit: My patch/hotspot is basically the town in which I live : http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L3609781

I've gotten a few nice birds there (Carolina Wren, Broad-winged Hawk, Cassin's Kingbird, and Rusty Blackbird).

Also I have just begun to bird a reservoir ~5 minutes from my house but it hasn't produced much: http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L4901357

 

Got Herring Gull and Northern Shoveler for main patch, two species which I was bound to see sometime. I visited the reservoir twice since last posting, getting three new birds for the hotspot: Ferruginous Hawk, Bushtit, and Common Merganser. The hawk is rather uncommon in the area, as I have only observed the species once in Louisville. 

Meanwhile, in the mountains I have four main hotspots:

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L4646156?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L3740792?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L4303351?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L3739470?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

Combined, these have so far held three first county records on Ebird and a few rarities.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine isn't a Hotspot, it's a cow field i live next to, and You can see the whole field from my porch. It's a great place to Bird, and I've seen 44 Species There.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the habitat near me is either typical western scrub (with Gambel's Oak) or Ponderosa Pine woodlands, so I enjoy biking to this spot the most. It is the nearest place to me with a good enough chunk of riparian habitat with deciduous trees and shrubs to suffice for some nice migrants. Seeing someone else's Northern Parula, Baltimore Oriole, Worm-eating Warbler, and Blackpoll Warbler opened my eyes up to this under-birded hotspot, and since those sightings I have been checking the Open Space frequently, especially during migration. Best birds I've found there myself include Black Phoebe (2nd or 3rd county record), Swamp Sparrow, Winter Wren, Common Poorwill, Chestnut-sided Warbler, and Chimney Swift. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L2686596?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

My patch is my neighborhood. There's a nature trail that runs alongside a power cut. The habitat is lawn, mixed forest, shrubby/scrub habitat along the powerline, and a small stream within the forest. That is all surrounded by suburbs. There's also some mature hardwood forest which is beautiful, but, of course, it's going to be developed. I'm hoping they at least leave some parts intact, but I doubt it.

Anyway, I'm proud of what I've managed to find in it. It's not quality habitat at all. I've found 26 species of warbler (counting chat), including Kentucky and Wilson's (both are pretty good for a random patch of woods in the middle of the suburbs), Clay-colored Sparrow, Merlin, and Sedge Wren. I've also recorded 54 breeding species (which will be less, thanks to that development). 

I also keep a list of needs for that spot... things I should be able to find relatively easily. Right now, I'm looking for Orange-crowned Warblers and White-crowned Sparrows. I'm also considering going owling one of these nights and seeing if I can rustle up a screech-owl.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Saphine said:

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L2686596?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

My patch is my neighborhood. There's a nature trail that runs alongside a power cut. The habitat is lawn, mixed forest, shrubby/scrub habitat along the powerline, and a small stream within the forest. That is all surrounded by suburbs. There's also some mature hardwood forest which is beautiful, but, of course, it's going to be developed. I'm hoping they at least leave some parts intact, but I doubt it.

Anyway, I'm proud of what I've managed to find in it. It's not quality habitat at all. I've found 26 species of warbler (counting chat), including Kentucky and Wilson's (both are pretty good for a random patch of woods in the middle of the suburbs), Clay-colored Sparrow, Merlin, and Sedge Wren. I've also recorded 54 breeding species (which will be less, thanks to that development). 

I also keep a list of needs for that spot... things I should be able to find relatively easily. Right now, I'm looking for Orange-crowned Warblers and White-crowned Sparrows. I'm also considering going owling one of these nights and seeing if I can rustle up a screech-owl.

Seen a lot of awesome habitat destroyed for another parking lot and office buildings, including the orchards and fields I grew up next to. It's cool where I'm at now. I'm surrounded by designated "Open space Linkage preserves," which provide habitat for animals to travel from coast to mountains, and habitat for California Gnatcatchers and Cactus Wrens. No building allowed.

Edited by creeker
added content
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have several patches that I zealously keep lists for.

My neighborhood has produced 165 species over the years. My personal highlights are 15 species of ducks, some first-for-the-county American White Pelicans, both night-herons, Wilson's Snipe, Greater Yellowlegs, and 29 species of warblers (including Nashville, Blue-winged, Blackburnian, Kentucky, Prairie, and Golden-winged). 

My main other focus is the collection of parks within my county. There's quite a few of them, some of impressive size (for one of the most populated counties in Georgia) that have turned up quite a few goodies.Some highlights include Ross' Goose, Greater Scaup, White Ibis, American Avocet, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Sedge and Marsh Wrens, 32 species of warbler (Including Prothonotary and Wilson's), Vesper Sparrow, and Dickcissel. 179 species total.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just started birding this location and have 94 species in half a year. Haven't found anything rare yet, but have seen good birds like Yellow-bellied Flycatcher and Philadelphia Vireo.

 http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1169500

I've also birded this spot for several years now and I've found many good birds including Black-billed Cuckoo, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Rusty Blackbird, and Tundra Swan.

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L3215467

Of course there's also my yard, which I've see 88 species in over the past few years. Highlights there include Black-capped Chickadee (rare here), Merlin, and many Warbler species.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×