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      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.
Kediset

Picture taking on a grey day

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Kediset    6

Hi! I was wondering what kind of settings you would want to use to take a picture on a grey day... (Just realized I should have thought of asking way earlier after the last time I tried taking pictures of an osprey on a grey day.. now I must suffer poor quality pics of the bird eating some food. background's all lit up but the bird and everything else is all dark :()

ospreyfood.jpg

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lonestranger    2706

When taking photos of birds with a bright sky background, you will need to use exposure compensation. Bright skies, even grey ones, are brighter than the birds so the camera exposes according to the overwhelmingly brighter background and usually underexposes the bird. By using exposure compensation and overexposing the scene, the sky will be much brighter but the bird will be better exposed. Exposure compensation will work in Aperture and Shutter priority but not in Auto mode.  Manually exposing for the bird is my suggestion for shots like this but many people are terrified of trying Manual exposure. 

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LauraC    80

You can fix this one in post processing with minor editing.  In Photoshop Elements use Adjust Lighting then Shadows/Lighten Shadows.  In Picasa use fill light.  If you have a Nikon add D-Lighting while it's still in the camera.

If lightening it up makes it look noisy, De-Noise it.  You can use Topaz for that.

You posted a small image but I was able to lighten it up just fine and see both birds.  If I wanted to take the time with a larger image after I lightened it, I'd select the osprey and the larger branches and add clarity or crispness.

But, I agree that it's better when it comes out of the camera right.

 

 

 

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Bsmooth    5

You can do some post processing to at least get a look at the bird, but after boosting the light levels the noise will usually get pretty bad, depending on ISO settings and how the camera does with low light.

I used to use Aperture Priority all the time with some dialed in compensation, but now all I use is manual exposure, as I used to when I first had my Pentax K1000 years ago.

It take some practice yes, but nothing to be afraid of by any means. Once you get your exposure dialied in, you no longer have to worry about changing backgrounds, especially with Birds in Flight. Yes its another thing to learn, but its no different than seeing a bird for the first time, and learning more about it.

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Joejr14    1820
On ‎5‎/‎31‎/‎2017 at 2:05 AM, LauraC said:

You can fix this one in post processing with minor editing.  In Photoshop Elements use Adjust Lighting then Shadows/Lighten Shadows.  In Picasa use fill light.  If you have a Nikon add D-Lighting while it's still in the camera.

If lightening it up makes it look noisy, De-Noise it.  You can use Topaz for that.

You posted a small image but I was able to lighten it up just fine and see both birds.  If I wanted to take the time with a larger image after I lightened it, I'd select the osprey and the larger branches and add clarity or crispness.

But, I agree that it's better when it comes out of the camera right.

 

 

 

 

I respectfully disagree.  There's no 'fixing' this into a 'good' image.  It's much too underexposed where it matters to be fixable in post processing.  You're going to introduce a ton of noise into the image and if you have a dial in a ton of noise reduction you're going to end up with a bird with no definition.

 

This one should go to the recycle bin and be chalked up to a learning experience.  Post processing isn't for fixing images that aren't captured correctly by the camera - it's for making minor tweaks to a correctly exposed photograph.

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Bsmooth    5

Practice shooting in manual, the sooner you start and the more practice you get the better your images will be. Yes you will have shots you should just put in the recycle bin, it happens, but the experience will help and you'll learn.

This is coming from someone who used to shoot film, where you almost had to make every shot count. Now you can just throw them in the recycle bin, and it doesn't cost you anything at all except time.

 Anyone who wants to get better at Photography will eventually shoot in manual. I'm not saying you have to do it all the time, but it will help you uderstand more about what your doing. What have you got to lose, you can always go back If you want to.

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LauraC    80
On ‎6‎/‎20‎/‎2017 at 0:44 PM, Joejr14 said:

 

I respectfully disagree.  There's no 'fixing' this into a 'good' image.  It's much too underexposed where it matters to be fixable in post processing.  You're going to introduce a ton of noise into the image and if you have a dial in a ton of noise reduction you're going to end up with a bird with no definition.

 

This one should go to the recycle bin and be chalked up to a learning experience.  Post processing isn't for fixing images that aren't captured correctly by the camera - it's for making minor tweaks to a correctly exposed photograph.

After you d-lighten it, you select the bird, inverse the selection, DeNoise everything but the bird.  Then select the bird in Photoshop and using Topaz Adjust add Clarity. It's not going to be an award winning photo but it doesn't have to be tossed.  Cropping is in there somewhere because it's composed wrong.

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