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HamRHead

Young what?

15 posts in this topic

Any ideas on this bird? 6/11/17 Burke County, GA, 45 minutes south of Augusta.

i-wNWSb44-XL.jpg

i-S9tvjpm-XL.jpg

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This looks like a Northern Mockingbird that left the nest not that long ago.

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3 minutes ago, Sor A. Rail said:

This looks like a Northern Mockingbird that left the nest not that long ago.

Thanks. That never crossed my mind but I see what you mean.

Just now, Sean C. said:

Agreed.

Thanks. I can see the family resemblance.

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I agree, the bird is still a little fleshy in the gape.

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7 minutes ago, BigOly said:

I agree, the bird is still a little fleshy in the gape.

Thanks, BigOly...Always good to hear from you.

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Definitely young, but this isn't a Mockingbird. The tail pattern says warbler, with the darker outer corners to the outer tail feathers. The wing bars are too thin for a Mocker, and there's no white dash at the base of the primaries. There's also no spots on the throat or breast, and the iris is dark. Given the location and the presence of the wingbars, I'd say Pine Warbler.

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4 hours ago, psweet said:

Definitely young, but this isn't a Mockingbird. The tail pattern says warbler, with the darker outer corners to the outer tail feathers. The wing bars are too thin for a Mocker, and there's no white dash at the base of the primaries. There's also no spots on the throat or breast, and the iris is dark. Given the location and the presence of the wingbars, I'd say Pine Warbler.

Thanks, psweet. Are Pine Warblers nesting in Georgia? For what it's worth the exact location was eBird Hotspot, Turkey Pond, Burke US-GA.

Young birds can be tough. Thank you for weighing in. I greatly appreciate your expertise.

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Yes, Pine Warblers nest all across the Southeast, wherever they can find enough pines. If there aren't any pines in that area, it gets a lot tougher. Prairie Warbler and Yellow-throated Warbler are both widespread in Georgia, but I don't know that they would look like this. The only other warblers that would make sense, I think, barely reach northernmost Georgia at high elevation.

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30 minutes ago, psweet said:

Yes, Pine Warblers nest all across the Southeast, wherever they can find enough pines. If there aren't any pines in that area, it gets a lot tougher. Prairie Warbler and Yellow-throated Warbler are both widespread in Georgia, but I don't know that they would look like this. The only other warblers that would make sense, I think, barely reach northernmost Georgia at high elevation.

Thanks. Yes, there are plenty of pines. This bird was in a nice stand of pines. I guess if a bird is here year-round, then they are nesting here. ;) Is there a good website or other resource with bird nesting range maps?

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I would strongly suggest getting a good field guide, personally. But you might try Cornell's allaboutbirds.org, or the national Audubon online field guide at Audubon.org/field-guide.

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1 hour ago, psweet said:

I would strongly suggest getting a good field guide, personally. But you might try Cornell's allaboutbirds.org, or the national Audubon online field guide at Audubon.org/field-guide.

I do have a few books, but maybe not enough. I’m afraid I didn’t think through my question before I asked it. I understand that birds will be nesting in their summer range and also in their year-round range during the spring and summer. I guess what I’m wondering has more to do with the calendar—when will a given species be nesting? Here is a US map with dates, but if this is for all bird species it would have to be very general. https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/052708_nestingdates.pdf

psweet or anyone, are there similar nesting time-frame resources that would be more species specific?

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I'm not sure where to look for that. If a bird is migratory, then you can parse it out by the migration dates. Otherwise, you might see if there's a way to look it up in e-bird. They do allow people to input breeding codes, but I'm not sure how easy it is to recover that info.

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My gut reaction was a juvenile White-eyed Vireo, but I can see it as a Pine Warbler as well .

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I think there's enough pattern in the tail to rule out a vireo.

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