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I want to share a pic of a Red-backed shrike (Pie-grièche écorcheur in French - Lanius collurio) taken in France on "Le plateau des Millevaches" 


(The plateau of the thousand cows). 

This bird allowed me to approach a few meters from him, while normally he is very fierce.

I don't know if such a bird could be found in USA ????

The red-backed shrike (Lanius collurio) is a carnivorous passerine bird and member of the shrike family Lanidae. The genus name, Lanius, is derived from the Latin word for "butcher", and some shrikes are also known as "butcher birds" because of their feeding habits. The specific collurio is from Ancient Greek kollurion, a bird mentioned by Aristotle. The common English name "shrike" is from Old English scríc, "shriek", referring to the shrill call
This 16–18 cm (approx. 6.3–7.1 inches) long migratory bird eats large insects, small birds, frogs, rodents and lizards. Like other shrikes it hunts from prominent perches, and impales corpses on thorns or barbed wire as a "larder." This practice has earned it the nickname of "butcher bird."

The general colour of the male’s upper parts is reddish. It has a grey head and a typical shrike black stripe through the eye. Underparts are tinged pink, and the tail has a black and white pattern similar to that of a wheatear. In the female and young birds the upperparts are brown and vermiculated. Underparts are buff and also vermiculated.
This bird breeds in most of Europe and western Asia and winters in tropical Africa. The bird is listed as a "least concern" (LC) species on a global scale, but some parts of its range have seen a steep decline in numbers, so locally its status can be less secure.

IMG_0589small.jpg

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On ‎7‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 2:31 AM, jackicks said:

I don't know if such a bird could be found in USA ????

Cool bird.

We have two species of Shrike that commonly occur here in the USA; Loggerhead Shrike and Northern Shrike.  Very rarely we can get Brown Shrikes, which would usually be on the far western islands of Alaska near Asia, and less frequently on the west coast of the lower 48.

There was a very unusual Shrike that showed up in Northern California 2-3 years ago that could have been a Red-backed Shrike, but eventually people decided it was most likely a hybrid.

Talk about timing, though, the first ever record of a full-blooded Red-backed Shrike was just found about a week ago on one of those far off islands in Alaska.

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