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VtAnne

Good Camera For Beginning Birder?

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VtAnne    2

I've taken some nice photos with the only digital camera I've ever owned , a Kodak EasyShare Z740, as long as my subject sits still! I am ready to take my love of nature seriously and buy my first camera better suited for a moving animal. I've done some research online, and become quite confused, but I am certain this forum can steer me in the right direction.

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The Bird Nuts    1626

Well, the camera you have now has some features that could help reduce motion blur.  Manually changing ISO and using burst mode are some things that may help.  Others can probably give some more tips.

If you're looking to upgrade and you don't want something too complicated and expensive, I recommend getting a newer superzoom point-and-shoot.  I'd recommend them to any birder, not just beginners.  The zoom is so, SO helpful, not just for better composition, but for ID shots.  We have two from Canon - the Powershot SX40 (35x zoom) and Powershot SX50 (50x zoom).  But with that much zoom it is helpful to know how to hold a camera in a way that stabilizes it.  People who don't have steady hands will have difficulty taking clear photos, especially at max zoom.  It takes a lot of practice!

Example photos here! https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdnuts  Most were taken with the cameras I mentioned above.

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ferret    44

I'll agree with that.  Starting out, buying a canon sx500 superzoom was what really helped me start to enjoying myself while hiking.

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VtAnne    2

Thank you ferret. As per The Bird Nuts I've begun researching Canon cameras.

Sorry Bird Nuts - I'm having trouble with email and you may not have received my acknowledgement of your last kind response. My current Kodak camera is 2nd hand, and I never read the manual. Your recommendations lead me to download a manual and experiment more with settings. I haven't gotten any different results yet. I do have a fairly steady hand, but this camera only has a 10x zoom.  My biggest problem is trying to photo through window glass, as it will more often focus on the glass rather than the subject. Suggestions?

 

 

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jhall251    7

After losing :( my Canon sx30 I am experimenting with a Panasonic Lumix zs50 - fits in a shirt pocket but has a 30x zoom - not having the bulk of the Canon is nice, still evaluating the picture quality. It has a shooting thru glass setting.

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The Bird Nuts    1626
2 hours ago, VtAnne said:

My biggest problem is trying to photo through window glass, as it will more often focus on the glass rather than the subject. Suggestions?

Does your camera have a light that shines on an object to help the camera focus on it?  Usually you can test to see if it's on if you hold down the shutter button halfway.  On my camera it's called AF-assist Beam.  I don't know if it will help, but I would try going to the options and turning that off when taking photos through a window if it's possible.  If that doesn't help, I'm not sure what else would...other than cleaning the window. :P

2 hours ago, VtAnne said:

Sorry Bird Nuts - I'm having trouble with email and you may not have received my acknowledgement of your last kind response.

Hmm, no, I haven't received any new messages from you.  Maybe you can try again?

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NobleBunny    815

Hi VtAnne!

I am still using a beginners point and shoot camera. It's great for birding because it has built in high zoom ability, plus is has motion stabilization. I'm going to be upgrading to a better camera soon, but this camera was wonderful for getting me comfortable using a camera & happy with the quality of my photos.

Nikon Coolpix B700

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