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      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.
    • Aveschapines

      Found a baby bird or a sick or injured bird?   07/11/17

      Here is a short article with advice for what to do if you find a baby bird or one that appears to be sick or injured. Bird rescue article Please feel free to post here if you have questions or need more help.
philba

Northern Goshawk?

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philba    0

I saw this bird near my house (Seattle, WA USA) and was only able to get one photo through the foliage and a pretty bad one to boot before a truck on the road spooked it.  I looked through Sibley and the closest I could find was the Northern Goshawk.  It didn't seem that big to me (about the size of a red tail hawk) so that brings the Goshawk ID into question - Sibley says up to 22 inches.  Any one have a better idea? The habitat here is lots of mature trees (Douglas Fir and Big Leaf Maples) and some open areas. Lots of mice, chipmunks, rabbits, grey and Douglas squirrels around so it is rich in prey. Date is Sept 8, 2017. Time was about 2:45PM.

R9081432_DxO.jpg

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philba    0

Thanks. Sibley shows both SS and Cooper's as having a moderately dark brown breast. And juveniles having light color breast with vertical striping.    Though pictures on the internet show some lighter colored pictures. Also, looking closely at the bird's breast, what I though was foliage (lots of dead branches in that particular tree) could actually be a light brown on the breast. Hard to say for sure. Wish I'd gotten a better shot.  As it was, I was at the long end of an 800mm lens.

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psweet    7789

This is indeed a Cooper's Hawk, with the cheeks blending into the nape. That rusty brown barring is typical of an adult Coop. Adult Goshawks would have a pale gray breast and a prominent white eyebrow. Goshawks are also a bit smaller than Red-tails (albeit a bit longer because of the longer tail), and show a noticeable size range, since males are smaller than females. A small male Gos isn't much bigger than a large female Coop. We say it a lot on here -- beware of making size estimates in the field. Without a direct comparison they're surprisingly difficult to do. Trying to tell the difference between an average of 19"  and an average of 21" is simply borrowing trouble.

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Aveschapines    2107

The tree trunk looks light and pinkish; unless you have some pretty pink trees there I would assume the light and pinkish color on the bird is also caused by some photo artifact or nearby object reflecting color onto the bird and tree. 

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psweet    7789

The tree looks good for a number of our conifers, which is what I'd expect up there. The color on the bird's breast looks just fine for a Coop, as does the rest of the bird.

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