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    • Bigfoot

      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.
    • Aveschapines

      Found a baby bird or a sick or injured bird?   07/11/17

      Here is a short article with advice for what to do if you find a baby bird or one that appears to be sick or injured. Bird rescue article Please feel free to post here if you have questions or need more help.

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Last month, I noticed two Mockingbirds flying through the trees at my home. They kept flying for about an hour, round and round through the trees, even up to about two feet in front of me. They didn't seem scared and they kept doing this all day. I figured they were taking up residence and marking their territory. One bird was a regular Northern Mockingbird one of which was resident here last winter, the other was new and was completely white. I am attaching a couple of pictures which I hope you will use and tell me if I identified correctly.

 

Regards

Ed Stines

1710093555.jpg

1710103868.jpg

1710103977.jpg

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This is often called “dilute plumage”. The bird retains its normal pattern of markings, but for some reason the amount of pigment is reduced. 

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3 hours ago, HamRHead said:

This is actually a Northern Shockingbird! ;)

very cool bird!!!  but I believe this is actually a Northern Mockingghost

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40 minutes ago, Gis said:

very cool bird!!!  but I believe this is actually a Northern Mockingghost

Yes! Masquerading as a miniature male Northern Harrier!

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Glad you all like it. Some of your alternate names are funny. This bird comes around very often and sometimes as soon as I make an appearance in the mornings, it will start singing and as if shouting to me, LOL.

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Our mockingbirds are very territorial and create issues with some of our more shy feeder birds.  I generally refer to them as mockingturds.

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I have learned to filter them out. I can go birding for half a day and not see the first one. Occasionally, though, one will slip through the filter. ;)

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On ‎11‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 8:24 PM, misspt said:

I generally refer to them as mockingturds

Interesting how that goes. Where I bird Mockingbirds are extremely rare and big thrill to see. This 'white' one is a real beauty.

The most problematic aggressive "feeder-pigs" around here are Steller's Jays but, fortunately, that's only a seasonal thing at our feeder.

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