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I just heard from a friend in North Carolina - Charlotte area

she put some suet out - in cages - and it attracted flying squirrels - who some how were able to get to all the suet ...

has anyone heard of this...waiting for pictures

 

 

dont have a date but assume in the last three months or so - Charlotte NC

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I'm waiting for pictures too, since flying squirrels aren't native to the Charlotte area.

I suspect she has gray squirrels, and that her suet feeder is located within 5 feet of a launching point.  Geronimo!  ;)

Tell her to try hot pepper suet, or move the feeder.

Edited by Charlie Spencer

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thank you..checking again about the area.....but from description  definately not gray squirrels.....they were first thought to be bats.  I will reconfirm location..thank you

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24 minutes ago, jcarscadden said:

thank you..checking again about the area.....but from description  definately not gray squirrels.....they were first thought to be bats.  I will reconfirm location..thank you

My apologies, but I forgot about the southern species.  Still, the hot pepper suet should run them off.

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We had a flying squirrel in our yard once. He didn't mess with the suet too much, but went nuts over the seed feeders. Our regular gray squirrels are notorious for eating all my suet, though, so I wouldn't be surprised if flying squirrels did it, too. 

I agree about hot pepper suet, although we once had a squirrel so desperate he ate it anyway. He just kept stopping to rub his face on our deck. Lol.

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Gray squirrels come in black but is it not that common.  maybe it was a Fox Squirrels?  They are larger and more likely to have black or reddish fur or even a combination of color morphs.  Flying squirrels are restricted to the higher mountain ranges.

 

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44 minutes ago, spyonabird said:

 Flying squirrels are restricted to the higher mountain ranges.

 

Uhh, tell that to this one. In Augusta, GA. This was in our backyard, in a neighborhood.

16029607723_7904da6fcf_b.jpgflying squirrel by midgetinvasion, on Flickr

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the squirrel were in Stanley CO NC which is east of Charlotte.  She lives in a large wooded lot.

I passed on the suggestion to try hot pepper suet

thank you all...and for the picture from Augusta...it was definitely flying squirrels she saw 

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4 hours ago, spyonabird said:

Gray squirrels come in black but is it not that common. 

 

Black squirrels are fairly common in the Washington DC area.  That's because some years ago several escaped from the National Zoo.  I don't know how far they may have spread beyond DC.  But as far as I know those black squirrels that escaped from the zoo account for all the black squirrels in the US.

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BLACK SQUIRRELS

Battle Creek Michigan had just about nothing but black squirrels..  When were there I was told that one of the Kellogg brothers had brought a breeding pair into Battle Creek and they got loose somehow.  Was also told that they can be very territorial which was the reason almost all the squirrels in Battle Creek were black

there a a lot of myths surrounding the Kellogg brothers ( yes of cereal and sanatorium fame) do dont know about this one

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On 1/15/2018 at 2:38 PM, meghann said:

Uhh, tell that to this one. In Augusta, GA. This was in our backyard, in a neighborhood.

16029607723_7904da6fcf_b.jpgflying squirrel by midgetinvasion, on Flickr

What a cutie!

I should edit my comment to say "usually" restricted to higher elevations. :)   

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Those guys are so cute.  And they're nocturnal, so they're active and eating at night.  We had a pileated woodpecker drill a couple of nesting-entrance-sized holes in a pine tree, and I woke up one day to see one of them filled with debris (leaves, pine needles, etc).  I wasn't sure what was going on with that so called someone I knew would know.  They said it's likely a flying squirrel that's found a place to stay warm in the winter, and that does seem to make sense.  One hole open, the other one filled.  They don't eat up a lot like the other 'daytime' squirrels do, so that's a plus. :) 

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here is the picture of the flying squirrel ( one of many) that  i was talking about. they swoop  in and

By the way, she has dozens of these critters at her home nearly every night.  She says that they will consume 2-3 blocks of the woodpecker suet in a night's time!

 

39734122792_c7cdda6132_k.jpg_ZMB1942 by Jim Carscadden, on Flickr

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This is a really interesting thread.  I was recently told by someone at a wild bird store recently that one of the two woodpecker holes in one of our very tall, mature pine tree may be inhabited by a flying squirrel.  I noticed the holes, then about 2 weeks later one of them was filled with debris.  The lady at the store said she thought it may be a flying squirrel because they sleep in those holes and pull in debris to block the opening.  But none of our bird feeders or suet cages, nothing are disturbed at night.  And we do have a platform feeder with a fruit and nut mix in it.  Sure wish I knew if a flying squirrel was in there or not.  I heard they can get into nest boxes even with predator guards in place.  They are cute little things, though.

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