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You got it, nice photo.

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Maybe I’m birding in the wrong areas?!?!? Your bird is sticking out, litterally! Everytime I go birding, I have to search through 150 horned larks, 75 meadowlarks, 300 sparrows, and 200 American Pipits just to “try” and locate a lapland... #ihatemylife

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14 hours ago, Toofly said:

Maybe I’m birding in the wrong areas?!?!? Your bird is sticking out, litterally! Everytime I go birding, I have to search through 150 horned larks, 75 meadowlarks, 300 sparrows, and 200 American Pipits just to “try” and locate a lapland... #ihatemylife

Hahaha Fiesta Island! I warned you. :D

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I think there's a rule -- you can't find a Lapland Longspur anywhere that never sees snow.

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45 minutes ago, psweet said:

I think there's a rule -- you can't find a Lapland Longspur anywhere that never sees snow.

Congrats on 27000 posts! :blink:

Also, will a Lapland ever be in a flock of SNBUs

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16 hours ago, Toofly said:

Maybe I’m birding in the wrong areas?!?!? Your bird is sticking out, litterally! Everytime I go birding, I have to search through 150 horned larks, 75 meadowlarks, 300 sparrows, and 200 American Pipits just to “try” and locate a lapland... #ihatemylife

Well, as psweet indicated, the snow-less San Diego area that far south and west is probably not the best place to look for them. But you never know.

The odd thing here is how conspicuous this bird is, thanks to the snow. In a snow-less area like where you bird these birds, when they are on the ground, tend to act more like mice than birds and creep around really low. That can be one way to separate them from some of the other birds you are seeing. They also have a very distinct 'rattled' flight call - only to be confused with a Snow Bunting where I bird - and that makes things a lot easier if you hear it. 

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6 minutes ago, Melierax said:

Also, will a Lapland ever be in a flock of SNBUs

Yes.

And yes, congratulations to psweet. 27,000 posts! And the vast majority of them very informative and educational and probably 99.999%  of them accurate on IDs. Way to go psweet and thanks!  

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17 hours ago, Toofly said:

Maybe I’m birding in the wrong areas?!?!? Your bird is sticking out, litterally! Everytime I go birding, I have to search through 150 horned larks, 75 meadowlarks, 300 sparrows, and 200 American Pipits just to “try” and locate a lapland... #ihatemylife

WHAT???????? :blink: can we trade birding patches please???? :P

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Thanks, everyone.

I believe finding Laplands and Snow Buntings together wouldn't be surprising, although usually I just see them as distant flocks flying around out in the middle of 1/4 section fields. A good way to find both, if you live in areas with both farm fields and snow, is too wait for a good snowfall, then a bit longer for the roads to clear. Then go driving through the fields -- with the snow cover, they'll come in to the roads to look for food.

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