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      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.

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Bird Brain:
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Curlybird:

Here's that House Finch with the strange bill again (I had posted this separately a while back).  This is the weirdest thing I have ever seen.  Apparently it isn't affecting his ability to eat, as I have seen him eating the seeds but poor thing!

Question - That bird
behind
the finch - is that a male House Sparrow?

Not a House Sparrow. From what I can see of it, Curlybird, it looks like a female Evening Grosbeak, although they're not supposed to be in your area according to my Sibley's. However, we all know that birds can't read, so they're likely to show up wherever they please!

Evening Grosbeak - really?  I thought it looked a little odd for a House Sparrow but figured maybe it was molting out of its breeding plumage.

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Matt:
A one and a half wing Neotropic Cormorant.  Never saw it fly, but it seemed to be doing well.

Is that the same bird that was tangled up in the fishing line in your previous post?  Glad to see he's okay, if it is the same one.  Hopefully his wing feathers will grow back?

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The first one had an injury to its left wing due to the fishing line wrapped around it.  The second bird lost half of its right wing, not just the feathers. 

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Matt:
The first one had an injury to its left wing due to the fishing line wrapped around it.  The second bird lost half of its right wing, not just the feathers. 

Oh, poor thing - hopefully he can get by without being able to fly.

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lyceel:
These have gone from oddities to downright depressing 
Sad

The fishing line problem depressed me while the missing winged cormorant was a celebration.  Most handicapped humans attack what life has dealt them and are as optimistic as if they were healthy.  This Willet also fascinated me.  I saw it on multiple hikes and it seemed to be doing very well.  The cormorant will make it too.  The survival instinct will drive them to succeed.  I hope that the fishing line picture will inspire everyone to go out of their way to pick up discarded line when they see it and to mentor youngsters regarding the proper disposal of line and lead weights.

The picture of the dove has it's own message which I don't need to repeat.

WhatBird is a celebration of nature.  If I make just one person think twice about what I publish I feel like I have done some good.         

Edit: my original intention of this thread was to post all the pictures that I had that were odd, those things that made me look twice, made me think.  That some of them evoked an emotional response was unforeseen and unintended, but in hindsight could have been predicted.  Sorry for any offense created.

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Matt:
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lyceel:
These have gone from oddities to downright depressing 
Sad

The fishing line problem depressed me while the missing winged cormorant was a celebration.  Most handicapped humans attack what life has dealt them and are as optimistic as if they were healthy.  This Willet also fascinated me.  I saw it on multiple hikes and it seemed to be doing very well.  The cormorant will make it too.  The survival instinct will drive them to succeed.  I hope that the fishing line picture will inspire everyone to go out of their way to pick up discarded line when they see it and to mentor youngsters regarding the proper disposal of line and lead weights.

The picture of the dove has it's own message which I don't need to repeat.

WhatBird is a celebration of nature.  If I make just one person think twice about what I publish I feel like I have done some good.         

Good points, Matt.  I think a lot of people don't really think about our birds and what problems we cause for them.  I, for one, always cut up my six-pack plastic rings so that birds or marine mammals don't get caught in them if the items end up in the sea.  Just little things like that can make a difference.  I hate seeing birds in distress, though; even though I know it happens it's still not pleasant to see.

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I was thinking I would have a good one after this weekend.  We have 1 bar-tailed godwit mixed in with about 1,000 marbled godwits.  I'm keeping my fingeres crossed that we see the flock.  They usually hang out at one location.  I agree - this thread has taken a turn that we didn't expect.  I was thinking we'd see a while feather on a crow or something along that line.

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I'm not trying to keep you from expressing yourself.  I just got depressed from seeing one injured bird after another every day I checked the photo forum.  I'm just used to seeing pretty pictures here, I guess. 

You're free to post what you want, of course.  That was just my knee-jerk reaction.

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lyceel:

I'm not trying to keep you from expressing yourself.  I just got depressed from seeing one injured bird after another every day I checked the photo forum.  I'm just used to seeing pretty pictures here, I guess. 

You're free to post what you want, of course.  That was just my knee-jerk reaction.

Well said, lyceel.

I think it brought out at least one good point though...... that we should remember that what we humans do has an effect on all wildlife. Whenever I go fishing, not only do I not leave any of my own fishing line behind, I also pick up what the slobs have left behind. I'll never forget when I was about ten yrs. old, my Dad and I found a small bird that had one leg tangled in some fishing line. The harder it had tried to escape, the more the line tightened on its leg. That leg was withered and dead from its knee down, and was dangling loose. My Dad caught the poor bird, and had to cut its leg off where the line had cut into it. The bird flew away, and more than likely survived and adapted to being one-legged. Made a big impression on me, and I have never forgotten it!!

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I posted this once before but this is a perfect place for it.  This Magpie lost a tail somewhere.  I believe it was the mom to six that hatched this last spring.  Look pretty funny.

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I did some research.  Mourning doves lay two eggs.  On occasion, another mourning dove my lay an egg in another's nest.  Cases have been observed where the resident dove moves one of the eggs out of the nest.

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Still short of two years of birding and putting out bird seed.  I have seen some strange stuff, didn't photograph it, and regretted it.  Now I shoot everything.  Mourning Doves are pretty tough birds.

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Curlybird:
This isn't an "abnormality" but I found it very funny, as I never saw it before (some of you may have seen this in your outings).  Look how these Black-necked Stilts are "sitting", with their legs bent like a "chair".  I never knew they did this!

Curly,

You did recognize that only did you have a picture of Black-necked Stilts but also American Avocets?

 

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Jim Penny:
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Curlybird:
This isn't an "abnormality" but I found it very funny, as I never saw it before (some of you may have seen this in your outings).  Look how these Black-necked Stilts are "sitting", with their legs bent like a "chair".  I never knew they did this!

Curly,

You did recognize that only did you have a picture of Black-necked Stilts but also American Avocets?

 

Sure, Jim - I knew there were Amer. Avocets; I was only pointing out the BN Stilts because they were in the foreground.

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