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      Whatbird Forums Rules   01/08/17

      'Help Me Identify a Bird' rules: When posting a new thread, please: 1. Read the FAQ and forum rules before posting 2. Include the location in your Post when seeking ID 3. Include the date of the sighting 4. Provide a photo or detailed description of the bird Forum rules: By posting in the WhatBird forums you agree to the following board rules: 1. You will be tolerant and respectful of your fellow members 2. You will not spam 3. You will not post sexually explicit, vulgar or racist material 4. You will not advertise or sell products 5. You will not discuss illegal activities 6. You will keep topics of religion and politics to a bare minimum 7. You will not take advantage of chat to break any of the above rules. 8. Members will not discuss homosexuality nor make any comments about others' sexuality. Breaking any of these rules may result in a suspension or a permanent ban from the forums!! Furthermore, anyone who causes continuous dissent and disarray in the forums will be banned as seen fit by the forum moderators under the pretense of "trolling." Gallery photos: Regarding photos in the Whatbird gallery, please keep in mind that the copyright belongs to the person who took the photo. So please do not use any of the Gallery photos without requesting permission from the photographer. Forum Photos: If you use photos other than your own, please place a link to the referenced photo and do not post other photographer's work directly.
    • Aveschapines

      Found a baby bird or a sick or injured bird?   07/11/17

      Here is a short article with advice for what to do if you find a baby bird or one that appears to be sick or injured. Bird rescue article Please feel free to post here if you have questions or need more help.
psweet

Alaskan Peep

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psweet    7700

I've been working through my photos from my recent trip, and came across this guy. I assumed it was a Semipalmated at the time, but the rufous scaps don't seem right, and the face and secondary coverts don't seem right for Western, so I thought I'd bounce it off everyone I could.

7854073322_724e00158a_b.jpg

Peep sp 8-8-12 1 AK by psweet1, on Flickr

7854073322_724e00158a_b.jpg

Peep sp 8-8-12 1 AK by psweet1, on Flickr

Seen in the parking lot of the Safety Roadhouse, 20 miles east of Nome.

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Liam    6387

Not making any sort of call here, but have you considered Red-necked Stint? I suppose the bill is too long for that?

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psweet    7700

Actually, Liam -- I have considered that. I wanted to see if anyone would consider it without my prompting. I can't see anything to rule it out, but I don't know if I can see enough to call it yet, either. Thanks!

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Liam    6387

I'm not experienced enough to call it either way, but maybe you could post it to the Alaska listserv or contact a local expert to see what their thoughts are.

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psweet    7700

I tracked down a couple of other sources, and one of the key features in Red-necked Stint appears to be that they have a much longer primary projection than the other peeps. Went back to the photos, and guess what! I'll still find someone local to fire it off to, but it looks like a Red-necked.

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Liam    6387

If you're on facebook, try posting to this group, they'd love to know about it even if Red-necked Stint is a possibility. If it turns out to be Red-necked Stint, your sighting could be featured on the ABA Blog. In fact, the group is where Nathan gets a large bulk of the rare reports.

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NJ Birder    278

I know this is old, but this bird's plumage REALLY looks like a juvenile Red-necked Stint. The rufous upper scapulars, as well as primary projection and bill size and length support RNST. But there is one thing that bothers me. On a typical RNST, the gape at the base of the bill should be a little bit more exposed than what this bird shows. Compare photos of SESA and RNST and you'll see what I mean. This could easily be the angle or a feather shifting from the wind. There are records of super bright juvenile SESAs that resemble juvenile RNST. 

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psweet    7700

I had concluded that it's a Red-necked Stint. They're not even considered to be rare up there. As I recall, Larry Balch took a look at this shot (this was the better of the two that I got) and thought it was a Little Stint, but I don't think that fits. (For those too young to recognize the name, Larry Balch used to run the famous tours to Attu. He lives in Rockford, IL.)

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psweet    7700

For tough ones, you look for help wherever it might come from!

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NJ Birder    278
1 hour ago, psweet said:

For tough ones, you look for help wherever it might come from!

This one is indeed tough. 

 

Heres an article regarding the gape field marks tat are useful for ID'ing stints: http://blog.aba.org/2013/02/open-mic-a-new-field-mark-for-differentiating-stints-and-peeps.html

 

This field mark is relatively reliable, but of course not 100% reliable.

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lonestranger    2662

Wow, @Sean C., you actually have the balls to stick your tongue out at someone like psweet, or anyone else, for posting an ID request? It's not like psweet was trying to determine whether his photo was a duck or a dove. :blink:

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Sean C.    1657
3 hours ago, lonestranger said:

Wow, @Sean C., you actually have the balls to stick your tongue out at someone like psweet, or anyone else, for posting an ID request? It's not like psweet was trying to determine whether his photo was a duck or a dove. :blink:

I was joking....... :unsure:

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psweet    7700

Don't worry about it, Sean, I took it as a compliment!

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psweet    7700

NJBirder -- looking at that site, and at my original shots where I can zoom way in, the detail's not really good enough to say 100%, but it appears as if the feathering on the lower mandible fits Red-necked just fine. The upper mandible shows the feathering rather more vertical than she shows, though. As she noted, though, molt, etc. can affect this to some extent.

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NJ Birder    278
1 hour ago, psweet said:

Don't worry about it, Sean, I took it as a compliment!

Just picking out this bird in a bunch of Semipalms is crazy hard!

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NJ Birder    278
1 hour ago, psweet said:

NJBirder -- looking at that site, and at my original shots where I can zoom way in, the detail's not really good enough to say 100%, but it appears as if the feathering on the lower mandible fits Red-necked just fine. The upper mandible shows the feathering rather more vertical than she shows, though. As she noted, though, molt, etc. can affect this to some extent.

Really? I can't see it that good I guess. It is rather variable, and like you said, molt, weather, and conditions can affect the feathering, as well. I usually like relying on plumage and body shape details to ID juvenile and molting stints rather than using the gape feathering as a primary trait. I commented on this photo before I fully learned plumage and body shape traits typical of RNST. In the photo, I now realize how unusually bright the upper scapulars are compared to a typical juvenile SESA. The wing coverts aren't as dark as I would expect of SESA. I now agree with RDST.

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